EXTENDED VOICES: 'CSI' Star Helps Get Out the Vote

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Marg Helgenberger, the Emmy-award-winning star of "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," will tell the story on national television about her "first time" -- her first time voting, that is. The actress has teamed up with "Women's Voices, Women Vote" for a PSA campaign that encourages women to show their strength in numbers at the polls this November.

"You want me to tell you about the first time I did it?" several women say in the ad. "I think the best time is in the fall. I like to do it in the morning. I told everybody, I had such a big mouth about it. I made the right choice."

Helgenberger sat down with ABC News' Peter Imber on "This Week" to tell the nation why voting is important to her.

Watch ABC News' "This Week" Sunday to see Helgenberger discuss her role in the campaign to get women to vote. Check your local listings for "This Week" air times in your area.

Marg Helgenberger: My first time was, I was in college. And it was the presidential election. And, well, I should take this back. I remember when I was in high school, my sister was a, she's about a year older -- 11.5 months, to be exact -- older than I am, and she was able to vote. And I was actually quite envious that she was able to vote and I couldn't. And four years later, of course, I was able to. And it didn't actually go in … my favor. It didn't go the way I wanted it to go. But at least I got out there and I … did my part. And I felt good about that.

Peter Imber: How important of an issue is this for you?

Helgenberger: Voting? It's a pretty big issue. I mean, I'm always kind of astonished by the amount of people that don't vote. … I encourage people on the set; "Are you voting? Are you voting … in the next election?" And some of them say, "Oh, I don't know. I don't know much about the candidates or the issues." And I actually got this answer back: "Well, then I have to-- If I register, then it means I might have to be up for jury duty." Now this is just something, kind of a lame answer like that. Because there's a lot of people that are apolitical, a lot of people that, I don't want to say they don't care, they just don't want to go to take the extra effort to go to a voting booth. … It's beyond my comprehension why somebody doesn't want to get out there, and it's our right, you know? And I don't … get it. …

Imber: How important is the women's vote? …

Helgenberger: I think the women's vote is very important. I think the fact that there was 20 million women, single women, in the last election that didn't vote-- When I heard that figure, I was kind of saddened by it, actually. … Women had to fight for their right to vote, and there were so many of us that didn't. I did. But, so it made me wonder why. And I guess I'm hearing that women felt that their vote doesn't matter; they feel somewhat powerless in the situation. But if this group of women were to be hopefully inspired by these ads and to actually make it to the voting booth, they could really make a difference in the election results. …

Imber: What do you hope that this ad campaign might accomplish?

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