Mark Zuckerberg on 'This Week'

Facebook CEO and FWD.us founder Mark Zuckerberg on immigration, NSA spying, and HealthCare.gov.
3:00 | 11/24/13

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Transcript for Mark Zuckerberg on 'This Week'
There is facebook founder, mark zuckerberg, taking his company public, becoming an instant billionaire, and now the 29-year-old is taking on washington, putting his brains and bankroll behind the push for immigration reform. He sat down with abc's david wright to talk about all of that and the dangers of domestic spying and his take on all of those obama care website glitches. Reporter: In a room full of hackers the guy in the hoodie stands out, in fact, mark zuckerberg counts as an elder statesman. The 29-year-old founder of facebook is exactly the success story these other bright, young faces hope to be. If the u.S. Government allows them to stay in this country. What is your status? Undocumented -- Reporter: These young people are all undocumented immigrants. Taking part in a two-day hackathon, part of a silicon valley lobbying group pushing for immigration reform. I was teaching an after-school program, one of my top students put his hand up and he said, I don't think I'm going to be able to college because I'm undocumented. Reporter: For mark, it was an eureka moment. When you meet these children who are really talented, they grew up in the united states, but they don't have the opportunits that, you kn, that we all enjoy, it's really heartbreaking. It seems like it's one of the biggest civil rights issues of our time. Reporter: A civil rights issue, how do you mean? There were 11 million undocumented people living in the country. Reporter: Some would argue that they are breaking the law. What would you say to them? There are a lot of misconceptions about that and a lot of them came here because they just want to work and they want to help out their families and they want to contribute. We definitely should make it so they can there's a path to come into the country legally as well. Reporter: The new ad that zuckerberg's group rolled out this week to put pressure on washington. The future of our economy is the knowledge economy. And that means, getting the most talented people into this country is the most important thing that we can do to make sure that the companies of tomorrow are founded here. Reporter: The harder case is for the nonskilled labor. One of the things here that it's shows, that even if you know you're a child of someone who came here, you still are probably one of -- you can be one of the entrepreneurs of tomorrow and that's the america dream. Reporter: In practical terms, fwd.Us is pushing for three things. More visas especially for highly-skilled workers. And a pathway to citizenship and securing the borders. Earlier this fall, mr. Zuckerberg sat aside his signature hoodie and put on a suit and tie for a round of lobbying on capitol hill. Are you more or less optimistic after your recent trip to washington? I'm fundamentally an optimistic person as an entrepreneur. We have to push forward. It these to happen. Reporter: We also asked zuckerberg his thoughts on two other digital issues, nsa surveillance for one, facebook has faced its own questions over users' privacy but has pushed back hard against the government's wholesale collection of data. I certainly think we all want national security, right? We want to live in a safe country and we want to be protected from risk. Reporter: Is the route to safety through the mass collection of data? There's always a balance in terms of doing the right things and also being clear in telling people about what you're doing. I think the government really blew it on this one. I think they're continuing to blow it in some ways. I hope they become more transparent in that part of it. Reporter: And there's the program where president himself blew it big time the troubled website healthcare.Gov. What advice would you have for the president on his poor website? You know, sometimes stuff doesn't work when you want it to. The right thing here is to just keep on focusing on building the service that you think is right in the long term. Reporter: This is one area that zuckerberg has more expertise than the folks in washington, before for now, now he's keeping his eyes focused on immigration reform. A political coming of age for the facebook founder and quite possibly silicon valley. For "this week," david wright, abc news. Mountain view, california. Thanks to david and mark for that. And when we come back -- maya angelou in our "sunday spotlight." The poet talks about her latest

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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