Top South Korean official: US government moved from 'strategic patience' to 'strategic confusion'

ABC News' Martha Raddatz reports on the North Korean nuclear threat from Seoul, South Korea.
3:16 | 08/13/17

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Transcript for Top South Korean official: US government moved from 'strategic patience' to 'strategic confusion'
The latest on the north Korean nuke lore threat. Fire and fury. Locked and loaded. Kim Jong-un has responded in kind. Martha Raddatz is on the front lines of a possible war reporting from Seoul, south Korea. Good morning, Martha. Reporter: Good morning, George. A doubling or tripling down on the the threatening rhetoric. And the north Korean regime has fired back with threats that if acted on could begin a horrific cycle of violence. This morning, a 35-mile trip to the border, to the demilemilitarized zone. Where some 14,000 north Korean artillery pieces point toward South Korea's capital. A direct threat to the 26 million people who live in Seoul. Whenever there are visitors to the dmz. Soldiers from the U.S. And south Korea stand guard. We're on the south Korean said. Where the gravel ends and the sand begins, that's north Korea. Daniel Mcshea has been here for four year. He says they are always ready. The rhetoric heat is probably more than I've seen personally. Reporter: It's more than anyone has ever seen from a U.S. President. Tuesday. North Korea best not make any more threats to the united States. They will be met with fire and fury. Like the world has never seen. Reporter: Friday. If anything happens to Guam, there's going to be big, big trouble in North Korea. Reporter: It was Wednesday that Kim's regime threatened to send four missiles to the waters off Guam and called president trump's threats nonsense. This bellicose tit for tat is fraying nerves in the region. Many are urging restraint. President trump came up with the wording of fire and fury. Which is why we are so much concerned. Which is not what president moon want. Of course. It's a chicken game. I see why it's needed right now is mutual respect. Reporter: This man is a top adviser to the new president of South Korea. We have very much confused. Therefore, we think that now the American development has moved from strategic patience of the Obama administration into strategic con vugs. Reporter: What seems clear is that while the U.S. Military continues to flex its muscle and touts its readiness to fight tonight, there are no new ships being sent to the region. No mobilization to back up the president's fiery warnings. After years of punting the north Korea nuclear problem, the danger that country now poses is undeniable. It will now be up to president trump to decide how the handle it whups and for all.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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