Work, Weather and Wedding Planning Postpone Honeymoons

Mandel said he and his wife made no bones about the fact that they were on their honeymoon, even it was a year-and-a-half later. The result? Free champagne, a bed full of rose petals and lots of other perks from the hotel.

"We went out of our way to make sure everyone knew we were on our honeymoon," he said. "You should expect the same treatment. Who said a honeymoon has to be right after the wedding?"

Black, the Knot editor, said this strategy was a good one. "You should get the deluxe treatment no matter when you go," she said.

Work and Weather Also a Factor

Capella-Brown said her job was also a factor in the delay.

"I had no choice," she said. "As a teacher, I couldn't take a week off in the fall. We could have gone a bit sooner over the December break but wanted to spend our first married Christmas with our family in New York. We could have waited until spring to get married and honeymoon then, too, but why wait?"

The couple took two nights after the wedding to go to upstate New York for a "mini moon."

Black said the mini-moon-now, honeymoon-later approach is perfect for those who have to get right back to work. She said brides take an average of 3.2 days off to plan the wedding, and an additional eight -- the average number of days taken for a honeymoon -- may just not be possible, especially in a weak economy when people are worried about job security.

Of course, there's always the weather to consider.

Packer said one of the major factors playing into the decision to delay among his guests was that honeymooners want to take their tropical vacations while the weather in their hometowns is less than postcard-worthy.

"We're lucky to be a year-round destination here," he said. "So a February honeymoon for guests from New York, Dallas, San Francisco or London can be pretty appealing, even if it means pushing this trip back."

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