Only in the Hamptons: a $15,000 Rock Concert

"It's for music lovers. There are a lot of them that can afford that price bracket and looking for a better experience," added Kotovos.

Playing to the Crowd

Questions of worth aside, in order to sell $15,000 tickets, promoters had to seek out wealthy customers.

"It's out here in the Hamptons, playground of the rich and famous," said Graham, of the tony beach towns where summer homes are regularly bought and sold for millions. "It wouldn't have the same draw anywhere else with the prices as they are."

"[Event organizers] make no bones about the kind of crowd that they're courting," said Anderson, who believes most of the acts are geared towards an older, more successful demographic. "They thought, 'If we're going to cater a show to a specific tax bracket, we may as well hold it in a place where that tax bracket is going to be.'"

As much as for the music, Anderson believes many buyers will come simply to see and be seen.

"A big part of this is people going so they can say that they were there," explained Anderson. "There might be a sense of one-upping each other."

Palmer agrees: "I think it's basically a chance for people to say they spent that much money on their ticket."

Spreading the Expensive Love

Whatever their reasons, hundreds have already purchased tickets, including some "big names," according to Kotovos.

Building on the current buzz, Bulldog Entertainment is in the process of organizing similar high-priced events in cities around the world when the Social @ Ross series ends in late August.

But for Kyle Anderson, no matter where the event is held, only one performance really seems worthy of such a price tag:

"I think it would take the resurrected corpses of the dead Beatles," said Anderson laughing. "You'd probably get people to pay that much to see the zombie John Lennon."

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