Casey Anthony's Great Escape Detailed in Jose Baez's New Book

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Casey Anthony's Great Escape

A half-a-dozen helicopters over the airport prevented them from going there directly. They went to a lake, parked in a wooded area and waited until the helicopter trailing them gave up and left.

"We drove around, and I had no idea where we were, but Casey did," Baez wrote. "'You know about three blocks up on the left, do you know who lives there?' she asked. 'Zanny?' I blurted out. We cracked up laughing. 'Don't make me punch you,' she said."

Baez was referring to Zenaida Gonzalez, the fictional nanny Anthony claimed had taken Caylee.

With time to kill, the group went to an all-night Steak 'n Shake where Anthony had her "first meal of freedom" – a cheeseburger, fries and chocolate milkshake.

Anthony and Baez eventually made it to the airport and took off for St. George Island, an island on the Florida panhandle near Panama City. The defense team had rented a house on a secluded beach.

Since it was the middle of the night, the small airport was closed and the plane had to land based on the flashing lights of a car waiting for them below.

"Meanwhile I said to myself, 'Oh my God. After all this, I'm going to die in a f*****g plane crash with Casey Anthony. This is a blogger's dream come true,'" Baez joked.

That night, Anthony climbed up the roof where a "wound up" Baez was sitting and "took photos of her first sunrise of freedom."

When the secret location was discovered by the press, Baez had Anthony moved immediately.

"I had one of my investigators drive Casey to New York," he wrote. "While the entire national media was searching for her in Arizona and California, she was within walking distance of all of their offices."

Early in the book, Baez also discusses his belief that Anthony suffers from "serious mental health issues," which he realized after her elaborate stories led investigators on a wild-goose chase before being exposed as lies.

"She gave such vivid details from her imagination," Baez wrote. "This was a bit more than just lies."

Baez described Anthony as someone who was not "playing with a full deck." He wrote that he still wonders if calling in a mental health expert early on in the case may have affected the outcome. He did not call one to the jail because public records would show that the expert visited and Baez feared the visit would lead people to believe he was pursuing an insanity defense.

Baez also takes aim at a number of people in his book, including Anthony's mother Cindy Anthony, Nancy Grace and prosecutor Jeff Ashton.

Baez was shocked when Ashton did not attend Anthony's sentencing.

"I can think of nothing worse to do to your team, and all I have to say about that is that Jeff Ashton, you're a coward," he wrote.

Baez also had harsh words for Anthony's mother Cindy Anthony. He described his thoughts the day she called him and urgently requested that he meet her behind a church. She wanted him to deliver a message to her daughter about where to plant a rose bush for Caylee's birthday.

"Oh my God. The apple doesn't fall very far from the tree," Baez thought to himself. "That poor girl. This is whom she has for a mother."

Baez called Nancy Grace, who coined the Anthony nickname "Tot Mom," a "quack" when he described appearing on her show.

Anthony has been in hiding since she was acquitted last summer. She is on probation in Florida for a check fraud conviction, but the court ordered her location to be kept secret because of death threats she has received. Her probation ends Aug. 21, 2012.

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