Jaycee Dugard Interview: Flourishing After 18 Year Long Kidnapping

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Two of the most challenging moments for Dugard were giving birth to her two daughters in 1994 and 1997.

"I knew there was no hospital," she said. "I knew there was no leaving."

At just 13 years old, Dugard noticed she was putting on weight but didn't know why.

On a Sunday in 1994, the Garridos told her she was pregnant.

Before her abduction, the little girl who sold Girl Scout cookies and wrote stories, knew nothing about sex.

Dugard writes that giving birth was the most painful experience in her life.

"And then I saw her. She was beautiful. I felt like I wasn't alone anymore. [I] had somebody else who was mine…and I know I could never let anything happen to her. I didn't know how I was going to do that, but I did," she said.

The Kidnapping

Dugard remembers the last time she left her family's Tahoe, Calif., home to walk to her fifth grade classroom on June 10, 1991.

She'd packed her peanut butter and jelly lunch, worn her favorite kitty shirt and a butterfly ring given to her by her mother.

In all pink, she started on her walk.

"And [I] walked up the side of the hill…that was the safe way to go against traffic. And halfway up, my world changed in an instant," Dugard said. "I heard a car behind me."

Creeping behind Dugard were Phillip and Nancy Garrido. Phillip Garrido rolled down his car window.

"His hand shoots out and I just feel numb. My whole body is tingly…I fall back in the bushes," Dugard said.

Garrido had shocked her with a stun gun. Panicked, Dugard scooted back towards the woods. She remembers grasping a sticky pinecone, the last thing she touched while free.

Now, she wears a pinecone charm around her neck to symbolize her freedom.

"It's a symbol of hope and new beginnings and that there is life after something tragic."

After shocking her, the Garridos stuffed her into their car, hid her under a blanket in the backseat.

Nancy Garrido sat on her while Phillip Garrido drove to the couple's Antioch, Calif., home.

"It was so hot," she said. "I remember my throat felt very dry and scratchy and like I had been screaming, but I don't remember screaming," she said.

Dugard remembers hearing Phillip Garrido laugh and say, "I can't believe we got away with it."

"It was like the most horrible moment of your life times ten," she said.

When they arrived at their home, Dugard was stripped of her backpack, her pink clothes and her name. Garrido took her to the bathroom and told her she had to be quiet.

"I guess he wanted me to be clean…very scary. I was scared," Dugard said.

Dugard was forced to wear nothing but a towel at first and was locked in a semi-soundproof room that had only one window.

Somehow, Phillip Garrido missed the pinky ring her mother had given her. She'd hold onto that ring throughout her captivity. She'd also hold onto the hope that she'd see her mom again.

Clinging to the Memory of Her Mother

"I wondered if she found out what had happened to me, if she was looking for me," Dugard said.

Dugard worried that she'd forget what her mother looked like. She'd keep journals referring to her mother as just "her" because to write "mom" was just too painful.

Her mom, Terry Probyn, carried out a frantic search for her daughter, making tearful pleas on television.

She'd continue to hold vigils for her daughter when public interest in the family's plight waned.

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