Lauren Scruggs Tragedy: Injured Model Has Left Eye Removed

VIDEO:  Jeff and Cheryl Scruggs explain daughter Laurens condition after accident.
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Lauren Scruggs is recovering today after undergoing surgery to remove her left eye that was damaged when she accidentally walked into the propeller of a small plane 10 days ago.

Doctors at Dallas' Parkland Hospital, where the model and fashion blogger has been treated since the Dec. 3 accident, successfully replaced her damaged left eye with a prosthesis in the surgery on Wednesday.

"We are thankful for all of the strong and powerful prayers for this and the surgery today," Scruggs' family wrote on the website they created in her name at Caringbridge.com.

"The surgery consisted of removing her left eye, which included nerves. The doctors were excited about the surgery and said everything went as planned and unbelievably well," said the family.

Wednesday's surgery comes amidst of a week of progress for Scruggs, 23, of Plano, Texas, who accidentally walked into the propeller of a small plane after viewing Christmas lights above Dallas Dec. 3. The propeller sliced into her face and shoulder and severed her left hand.

On Monday the family announced that Scruggs had begun eating solid foods, including her favorites like sweet potatoes and hard-boiled eggs, and walking the hospital's hallways.

Her parents called her progress "a miracle."

"It's just a miracle to see the progress that she's been making," Jeff Scruggs said. "She's got her spunk back, her personality."

Scruggs took her first steps last week with the help of a physical therapist, according to her family. They say she's now fully alert, talking and walking the hospital's hallways by herself.

The update posted by family and friends Wednesday after Scruggs' successful eye surgery indicates, however, the long road of recovery that still lays ahead for the model.

"Along with the pain she was already experiencing with her arm and shoulder injuries, the removal of the left eye is also very painful," the family notes.

"We are asking again for prayer to relieve this pain, and also, as we have posted previously, pray for Lo to regain her appetite. This is crucial for her body to heal quickly."

Along with the Caringbridge.org website, the family has also set up the Lauren Scruggs Hope Fund to help support her long-term recovery.

Doctors at Parkland Hospital had warned the family from the beginning that she may lose her left eye, but continue to be pleased with the healing of her facial nerves.

"She's smiling... She's able to raise both eyebrows," Jeff Scruggs said. "That doesn't sound like a big deal, but they were worried about the nerve, on one side, and she's able to do that, so we're so grateful and thankful for all of that."

"Lo," as her family and friends affectionately call her, had just landed with a girlfriend after viewing Christmas lights from above in a small prop plane piloted by a family friend. The young communications graduate, who had started a fashion website called Lolo and had worked in the wardrobe department of the TV show "Gossip Girl," was thought to have turned to say a final goodbye to the pilot when the accident occurred.

The Federal Aviation Administration continues to investigate the accident.

The pilot who flew Scruggs above Dallas to view Christmas lights, Kurt Richmond of Frisco, Texas, has not answered repeated requests for an interview. ABC News has learned that the Scruggs family does not blame Richmond for the accident.

Click here for more information on how to help Lauren Scruggs.

ABC News' Ryan Owen contributed to this report.

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