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  • Back When Bars Were Banished

    Two men pouring alcohol down a drain during Prohibition, circa 1920. A nationwide ban on alcohol was in effect in the United States from 1920 to 1933 under the 18th Amendment.
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  • Back When Bars Were Banished

    New York City Deputy Police Commissioner John A. Leach, right, watching agents pour liquor into a sewer following a raid during Prohibition, circa 1921.
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  • Back When Bars Were Banished

    Police take axes and picks to canisters of illegal alcohol during Prohibition, circa 1929.
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  • Back When Bars Were Banished

    New Jersey prohibition director Col. Ira Reeves takes a Newark garage owner to task for advertising alcohol with the wrong kind of sign, circa 1927. He is handing the owner an acceptable sign, which specifies that the alcohol is denatured and for use in car radiators.
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  • Back When Bars Were Banished

    Barrels lined up by the side of a road in an American town where alcohol was found and confiscated during the Prohibition, circa 1925.
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  • Back When Bars Were Banished

    Bootlegger and alleged gunman Terry Druggan, sitting in a courtroom in Chicago, 1926.
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  • Back When Bars Were Banished

    Clients pictured drinking in an illegal bar in New York, in 1932. These illegal bars, which had a lot of success during Prohibition, were called speakeasies.
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  • Back When Bars Were Banished

    Women turn out in large numbers, some carrying placards reading "We Want Beer," for the anti-Prohibition parade and demonstration in Newark, N.J., Oct. 28, 1932. More than 20,000 people took part in the mass demand for the repeal of the 18th Amendment.
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  • Back When Bars Were Banished

    Prohibition protesters parade in a car emblazoned with signs and flags calling for the repeal of the 18th Amendment.
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  • Back When Bars Were Banished

    Whiskey consignment at the end of Prohibition, 1933.
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  • Back When Bars Were Banished

    People of New York celebrate the end of the Prohibition with beer, 1933. The repeal was a political platform for Franklin D. Roosevelt, who signed the Cullen-Harrison Act into law on March 22, 1933, allowing the first legal sale of beer since the beginning of Prohibition. The 21st amendment was ratified on Dec. 5 1933, which repealed Prohibition.
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