Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • A photo of Allison Elliot from the <a href="http://www.dearworld.me/"target="external">"Dear World"</a> series by Robert Fogarty. Fogarty and his team captured portraits of survivors and first responders at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, using the distinct Dear World style of writing positive messages on skin. "These survivors show us what it means to keep moving forward," Fogarty said. "And I'm honored and humbled that many of them said that the Dear World experience has been another component to their healing."
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • Heather Abbott. "My message is "Less Leg, More Heart." The reason I chose that message is because since I lost my leg at the Boston Marathon, I've become what the world considers and certainly America considers a handicapped person. And that's a very new concept for me, having been a healthy woman in my thirties before the marathon. I think that the experience of losing my leg has made me become more compassionate. So I may have less of a leg now, but I think my heart is bigger because of it."
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • Mikey Borgard, center, says, "After the marathon, I felt alone. I thought I would never be able to speak, acknowledge what had happened or trust anyone again. I was more afraid than I have ever been in my life. Jay and Barrett, the two other men in the photograph, showed me how to write about that pain in the past tense. They have spent the last year by my side, teaching me how to laugh again, how to accept what happened and move forward from it and, most importantly, how to forgive. Barrett and Jay remind me every day that humanity is good."
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • When the first bomb exploded at last year's Boston Marathon, David Fortier grabbed his ear drums. He had just reached mile 26.19. Fortier describes his hearing now as if you put your head next to a fluorescent light and kept it there. His doctors say that it may never go away. He says he feels lucky that his injuries weren't more devastating and that he is running in this year's race. "I had a great time for 26.19 miles," he says. "Once everything gets put back together," he says, "there will be a lot of people back. It's become a huge part of our lives."
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • "I'm Celeste Corcoran [center], from Lowell, Mass. My message is 'Still Standing.' I wrote still standing because the bombers hurt me -- they took my legs -- but I can still stand on them. I just love the play on the message. Writing it on my naked legs, seeing those words and having the prosthetics next to me. I'm still standing. To be a part of something like Dear World, to be asked to be a part of this, it gives me energy."
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • Dave Fortier, Marathon Survivor.
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • Nick Yanni, Marathon Survivor.
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • Lee Ann Yanni, Marathon Survivor.
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • Brittany Loring says, "'Love this life' has been my motto since the bombing. I spent a lot of time prior to the bombing always seeking out the next thing in my career and putting the majority of my focus on finding the right career for myself and on school. I didn't always take time to focus on those around me: my family and friends, the ones who I'd want to spend my last days with. Since the bombing, I've decided to spend each day as if it were my last."
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • "My name is Sydney Corcoran, I am 18 years old, and I live in Lowell, Mass. My message was 'You Can Scar Me, But You Cannot Stop Me.' I think that everyone has scars, and we should embrace them. I've learned that we can overcome the obstacles that gave those scars to us."
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • Alyssa and Brittany Loring. "Since the first few moments in the hospital, Brittany has had a positive attitude about healing, and we wanted a message that epitomized what our experience has been," Alyssa says. "The love and outreach of our community far outweighs the negativity of the event."
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • "My mom told me that this is what I said when I came out of my medically induced coma," Roseann Sdoia says. "We have deformities to our bodies, but I think it makes us stronger to be so open with it. I think it's part of our therapy to get through what happened to us. I feel like it was supposed to happen. I feel like my life was supposed to change. I don't know if it's to help others, but I feel like there was a reason for it. It happened to help bring some sort of awareness to disabilities or amputations. You definitely look at the world differently."
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • Michael Bourgault says, "Everyday my wife and I try to move on with our lives. We try to get back to where we were before this terrible incident took place after 36 years of marriage. Some days are easier than others, but we are reminded every day now about what we went through by some part of the media-news. All we can do is 'move on' to the next chapter of our lives together. We are also reminded of what we went through by the pain and suffering we still go through every day, both physically and mentally."
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
  • David Yepez says, "One thing that I’ve learned since last April is that in the world there are many bad people, but that there are also many good people that outweigh the bad people. When the bombings occurred, immediately there were people from all around the world of all ages who supported in any way they could."
    Robert Fogarty/Dear World
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