Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
  • Villalobos Rescue Center was established to give pit bulls another chance. The center – which was founded by Tia Torres – moved to New Orleans from Los Angeles County, California, in 2012, due to the needs of dogs in the New Orleans area especially after the Katrina disaster. Many dogs in New Orleans were abandoned in the wake of the hurricane, and Villalobos works to provide necessary medical care and re-acclimate the dogs to prepare them for adoption. Villalobos Rescue Center places about 15 to 20 dogs each month in adoptive homes.
    Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
  • Before and after photos of the center’s dog's reflect the animals’ resilience following Hurricane Katrina. Chili, seen in this September 2005 photo, was found two weeks after Katrina hit, according to Villalobos Rescue Center, found chained inside a house. The dog was named for her fiery red color and personality.
    Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
  • "Chili is fantastic with everybody she meets," Torres said. “Why this dog hasn't been adopted yet, we just don't know. She is so amazing." Chili, seen on Aug. 19, 2015, traveled from New Orleans to Los Angeles, then back again, with Villalobos Rescue Center.
    Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
  • Cash was found one month after Katrina hit, and Villalobos Rescue Center has been caring for him since 2005. Cash is seen in this September 2005 photo.
    Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
  • "Even though Cash was one of the survivors of Hurricane Katrina who is still with us and who knows what he went through, he remains one of the happiest dogs on earth. He is a staff favorite (especially with the ladies. Cash loooooves his ladies). Nothing can bring this guy down. Nothing,” Torres said. Cash is seen on Aug. 19, 2015.
    Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
  • Mouse, a white pit bull mix, is seen in this September 2005 photo. According to Villalobos Rescue Center, a New Orleans homeowner returned to their house following Katrina to find Mouse in the attic.
    Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
  • One problem: the homeowner didn’t own the dog. Rescuers believe Mouse may have floated in to the house through an attic window, and remained there after the waters receded, somehow surviving despite limited food and contaminated water. Mouse is seen on Aug. 19, 2015.
    Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
  • Villalobos Rescue Center believes Bullet – seen in this September 2005 photo – had a wonderful owner before Katrina, as he was found with a custom-embroidered collar. But the short, squatty pit bull’s owners were never found.
    Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
  • “Like so many of our Katrina dogs, some owners got scattered across the country and some sadly died in the murky waters of the southern state,” Torres said. The center hopes to find Bullet, seen here on Aug. 19, 2015, a new family after he was displaced from his previous home.
    Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
  • Belfast, a pit bull mix seen here in a September 2005 photo, enjoys to play. The dog – which resembles "a buffed out Fox Terrier," according to Villalobos Rescue Center – was found one month after Katrina hit. "He is similar to Gidget [Torres' dog] in personality. He would be great in a one-dog home. He loves people and tolerates other dogs and cats. He is a sweet independent old man,” Torres said.
    Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
  • Belfast is seen on Aug. 19, 2015. Many of the pit bulls rescued by Villalobos Rescue Center in Louisiana have heart worm, and the center estimates that it spends about $700 per dog in out-of-pocket expenses for spaying and neutering, shots, microchipping and heart worm treatment. The name “Villalobos” means “house of wolves” in Spanish, as the center initially focused on wolf rescue. VRC began focusing on pit bulls in 1994 but decided to keep the name. For more information about Villalobos Rescue Center and the center’s adoption process, visit vrcpitbull.net.
    Courtesy Villalobos Rescue Center
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus