Daniel Beltra, International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    The Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia makes up about 25 percent of the world's remaining temperate rain forests. Much of it is protected from loggin but conservationists worry about the impact from a new pipeline that will bring oil from the Oil Sands in Alberta to this coastline. The proposed pipeline would end just east of the rainforest, but supertankers would be allowed into the coastal waters for the first time in a quarter century to transport the oil.
    Daniel Beltra, International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    The spirit bear is a rare genetic variant of the black bear, with a double recessive gene that gives it a pure white coat. The bears are endemic to coastal British Columbia – meaning they are found nowhere else in the world – and with fewer than 500 in existence, they are rarer than great pandas.
    Ian McAllister, Pacific Wild / International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    Native communities like the Gitga'at Nation consider the spirit bear to be sacred. Gitga'at mythology says that the Raven, their creator God, gave the spirit bear white fur to remind humans of a time when the world was covered in ice and snow.
    Ian McAllister, Pacific Wild / International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    Scientists aren't sure why the spirit bear's coat is white, but one theory is that it gives them an advantage when fishing: in a temperate rainforest, the skies are often cloudy. When the fish look up at the white bear, it blends in with the clouds in the sky.
    Ian McAllister, Pacific Wild / International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    Sea lions swim in the waters surrounding the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. This image was part of the collection taken by a team from the International League of Conservation Photographers as part of an effort to document the landscape and species they believe are at risk from the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline project.
    Thomas P. Peschak, Save Our Seas Foundation / International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    Pink Salmon migrating up river to spawn in the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. The fish are a central part of the ecosystem here – providing food for the many bears, wolves and predatory birds in this area.
    Thomas P. Peschak, Save Our Seas Foundation / International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    Fisherman Wally Bolton pulls two pacific halibut from the water. Bolton and other members of the Gitga'at Nation oppose a proposed pipeline which would open up the waters near their home to supertanker traffic. They worry that an oil spill here would ruin their livelihood.
    Thomas P. Peschak, Save Our Seas Foundation / International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    A school of lion's mane and moon jellyfish trapped by tides and currents in a river mouth, Great Bear Rainforest, British Colombia, Canada.
    Thomas P. Peschak, Save Our Seas Foundation/International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    Sea lions gather on a rock in the waters along the Great Bear Rainforest. This image was part of the collection taken by a team from the International League of Conservation Photographers as part of an effort to document the landscape and species they believe are at risk from the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline project.
    Daniel Beltra, International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    A humpback whale breaching in the waters along the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. This image was part of the collection taken by a team from the International League of Conservation Photographers as part of an effort to document the landscape and species they believe are at risk from the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline project.
    Jack Dykinga, International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    A wolf prowling in the woods of the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. This image was part of the collection taken by a team from the International League of Conservation Photographers as part of an effort to document the landscape and species they believe are at risk from the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline project.
    Joe Riis/International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    A black bear shows off its catch in the Great Bear Rainforest. This image was part of the collection taken by a team from the International League of Conservation Photographers as part of an effort to document the landscape and species they believe are at risk from the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline project.
    Jack Dykinga, International League of Conservation Photographers
  • Spirit Bears

    A large starfish clings to a rock in Cameron Cove, part of the Great Bear Rainforest. This image was part of the collection taken by a team from the International League of Conservation Photographers as part of an effort to document the landscape and species they believe are at risk from the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline project.
    Jack Dykinga, International League of Conservation Photographers
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