Some School Anti-Bullying Programs Push Gay Agenda, Christian Group Says

Share
Copy

"The fact that they argue in this vein indicates that it is often gays and lesbians who are most often the targets of this abuse, and that's why it's doubly important to protect them."

Focus on the Family takes particular issue with recent curricula adopted in Alamdea, Calif. The school board there last year adopted an anti-bullying program for elementary school students that specifically mentioned gays and lesbians.

The Colorado-based organization says the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network has targeted thousands of school districts nationwide with literature. "Schools are only allowed to provide one message about homosexuality; that it's normal and should be embraced," Focus on the Family said of the gay group's message.

"The school introduced anti-bullying lessons but really they're teaching elementary school kids about gay marriage," Cushman told ABC News.com. "We think parents should have the right to teach kids about it in their own way."

Some Christian Parents Conflicted

The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network says its anti-bullying campaign was created with input from educators, psychologists and even members of religious organizations, and its goals are distinct from its support of same-sex marriage.

The group, however, does not deny that there is mention of same-sex marriage in some of its anti-bullying literature.

Some parents who advocate for anti-bullying legislation and are conservative Christians say they are torn between seeking the most programs in the most places and avoiding mention of homosexuality in the classroom.

"I am a Christian. I am conservative. Some would call me right-wing," said Brenda High, whose son, Jared,committed suicide in 1998 when he was 13 after being routinely bullied and beat up at his Washington state middle school.

"The problem is our schools are not teaching kids to become responsible adults. When you allow kids to call people names or bash them because they think they might be gay and make assumptions and judge people, that's when kids get hurt.

"There's nothing wrong with a little religion: Teach them the Christian idea 'to do unto others,' everyone gay or straight, any religion, even atheists agree with that one," she said.

-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11527833.
Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO:National Intelligence Director James Clapper
J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo
PHOTO: Cartoons Come to Life
troqman/Instagram
Baby Sister Baboons Play Peekaboo
ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images
PHOTO: Apple CEO Tim Cook shows off the new iPhone 6 and the Apple Watch during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts, Sept. 9, 2014, in Cupertino, Calif.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images