Tulane Law Student Exposed as Convicted Murderer

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He received a Dean's Merit Scholarship and an NAACP Legal Defense Fund scholarship for Tulane and is a member of the law school's class of 2014.

There is also a question about whether Reilly would even be able to practice law as a convicted felon. According to the Louisiana State Supreme Court, felons are not automatically precluded from practicing law, but they have the burden of proving "good moral character and fitness to practice."

Reilly insists that he was upfront with Tulane about his past and is determined to earn his law degree.

"By the time I apply to a state or federal bar, my last criminal activity will be as a teenager, and over two decades passed. I will be presenting a model case for rehabilitation, an impressive resume, and a substantial list of esteemed supporters," he wrote in his letter to "Above the Law." "I have found that a majority of our society believes in forgiveness and second chances, and all I can do is keep doing what I'm doing."

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