Utah School Under Fire for Asking Students to Write ISIS Propaganda Poster

PHOTO: A new teacher at Salem Junior High School in Utah gave an in-class assignment asking students to draw a propaganda poster for ISIS on Nov. 18, 2015.PlayKSTU
WATCH School Apologizes for ISIS Propaganda Poster Assignment

A Utah school is apologizing after a ninth grade teacher assigned students to draw a propaganda poster for ISIS.

The teacher, who's been on the job for just a few months, gave the in-class assignment to students in her two World Civics classes at Salem Junior High School in Salem, Utah, on Wednesday. About 60 students received the assignment, which required them to create a "neat, colored, professional" poster for the terrorist group, to "help students better understand the goals of terrorist groups and the methods they use to gain support," the assignment read.

The teacher included a note asking students to come forward if they felt uncomfortable with the assignment. None did, Lana Hiskey, a spokeswoman for the Nebo School District where the school is located, told ABC News.

But some parents did not think the assignment was appropriate, especially after six coordinated terrorist attacks last week in Paris have left 130 dead.

"We shouldn't be talking about how ISIS recruits, we should be discussing the events of what they have caused to figure a way of how to deter that and how to help better the world," Annie Langston, whose daughter received the assignment, told ABC News. "I thought this isn't right, not right now."

The possibility of having to search for ISIS recruiting material on the web at a time when officials are looking to detect potential threats was alarming, Langston said.

The assignment had not been approved by school administrators, Hiskey said, adding that teachers at the school meet each week to discuss best practices.

"That never happened with this one," said Hiskey.

Four parents contacted the school on Thursday to express their concern.

"As soon as the administration heard of this and reviewed the material, they immediately removed the assignment," Hiskey said.

The school contacted the parents of all students in both classes and notified the students that they were not required to complete the assignment, Hiskey said. The teacher said she is sorry about the assignment, according to Hiskey. She is still teaching at the high school.

"She did this innocently, she's a naive young teacher," Hiskey said. "She wants to do the right thing."