Cute Mouse Is a Real Scorpion Slayer

The grasshopper mouse can turn scorpion toxins into painkillers, allowing it to attack its prey.
2:01 | 05/02/14

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Transcript for Cute Mouse Is a Real Scorpion Slayer
This is the -- -- It has cinnamon colored bird and weighs approximately 25 grams making it only slightly smaller than the average pet hamster. It's a native mammal of the deserts in the southwestern United States and Mexico where it shares its habitat -- -- -- -- It's large black guys aren't adaptation to its nocturnal lifestyle. But it mostly relies on its lightning fast reflexes to survive. Rich it uses to -- and eaten scorpions. But what really makes this -- interesting is its ability to immediately turn toxins from scorpion venom into pain -- The mice have evolved the ability to based on multiple times but remained relatively unfazed. And continue attacking scorpion. Not only -- the mouse I'm faced but it actually feels less pain after being stung. Research at Michigan State University focuses on how this happens on a molecular level. Paint signals are mainly regulated by a couple of sodium channels. When the channels open mammals like house mice and humans feel pain. When the -- government house the -- the scorpion toxin bonds to one of the sodium channels and closes. So that the mouse feels -- -- As far as we know this is unique to -- -- This research has applications for human medicine. If medicines can be developed to interact with merely a single sodium channel in humans. And analgesics could be made to alleviate pain. Without any side effects.

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