School shooting suspect wanted to teach a lesson on bullying: Court documents

PHOTO: Parents gather in the parking lot behind Freeman High School in Rockford, Wash. to wait for their children, after a deadly shooting at the school on Sept. 13, 2017.PlayDan Pelle/The Spokesman-Review via AP
WATCH Student killed confronting gunman at Spokane school

A high schooler accused of shooting four classmates, killing one and injuring three, told police he came to the school to teach everyone a lesson about what happens when you bully others, according to court documents.

The shooting suspect, who is a juvenile and is not being named by ABC News, was apprehended after the Wednesday shooting at Freeman High School in Rockford, near Spokane.

According to court documents, the suspect denied targeting anyone specifically.

The documents say the suspect took several guns from his father's safe at their home.

The documents say a bus driver saw the suspect board the bus the morning of the shooting with a large athletic-style duffel bag that she considered suspicious because he doesn't play sports.

Surveillance video showed the suspect inside the school that morning pull out two weapons: an automatic rifle and a semi-automatic handgun, according to documents.

Authorities said the automatic rifle jammed.

“Thank God he had jammed that AR up so badly that it was not going to function," Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich said at a news conference today.

The suspect "transitioned to that pistol, and when one of the classmates that he knew came up to him and tried to talk him out of it,” the suspect fatally shot the classmate in the body and the head, the sheriff said.

The shooting killed one student and injured three, who were transported to a nearby hospital and are expected to survive, authorities said.

PHOTO: People gather outside Freeman High School after reports of a shooting at the school in Rockford, Wash., on Sept. 13, 2017.KHQ via AP
People gather outside Freeman High School after reports of a shooting at the school in Rockford, Wash., on Sept. 13, 2017.

After the shooting, the suspect surrendered to a janitor who ordered him to lay down on the floor, the documents say.

Knezovich said the janitor "confronted him, ordered him to the ground and held him there,” and then a school resource officer rushed in and helped the janitor take the suspect into custody.

One of the three injured students underwent surgery Wednesday and all three are in satisfactory condition this morning, a hospital spokeswoman told ABC News this morning.

Knezovich said today that when the suspected shooter goes in front of a judge, he wants the juvenile suspect tried as an adult for premeditated murder.

"This is just senseless violence," Knezovich said.

The sheriff also blamed the media for giving attention to shooting suspects and he stressed that more attention should be given to victims.

Knezovich said the community "is in mourning" in the aftermath of the tragedy. Tears were streaming down the faces of concerned parents as students left the building Wednesday, ABC Spokane affiliate KXLY reported.

Parent Brandi Albert said, “I always thought this is such a great school and you would never think that anything like this would ever happen here. But it can definitely happen anywhere.”

A Washington State Patrol trooper called Wednesday the "worst day" in his law enforcement career after responding to his “own kids school for [an] active shooter.”

"Worst day in my LE [law enforcement] career. To respond to your own kids school for active shooter," Trooper Jeff Sevigney tweeted hours after the shooting. "Prayers for everyone involved."

He has not responded to ABC News’ request for comment.

ABC News' Julia Jacobo contributed to this report.