Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    Clyde Barrow, one half of the notorious gangster duo Bonnie and Clyde, is shown as a teenager in a Dec. 3, 1926, mug shot from the Dallas Police Department files. He was charged with auto theft, but according to later records the indictment was dismissed. Records on <A HREF="http://texashistory.unt.edu/search/?fq=untl_institution%3ADSMA&q1=&q3=&q2=&q5=&q4=&searchType=advanced&q6=&start=0&o6=NOTANY&o5=NOTANY&o4=NOTANY&o3=EXACT&o2=EXACT&o1=EXACT&fq=untl_collection%3ABCM&t6=fulltext&t4=fulltext&t5=fulltext&t2=fulltext&t3=fulltext&t1=fulltext&q=&t=fulltext" target="external">Bonnie and Clyde</A> and other cases stored in the Dallas Municipal Archives are being placed online in "<A HREF=http://texashistory.unt.edu/ target="external">The Portal to Texas History</A>."
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    Undated photo cutouts of Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker.
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    This circa 1933 poster from an Arkansas sheriff's office declares Barrow and other members of his gang as "WANTED for Murder and Rape." From left are Bonnie Parker, Clyde Barrow, W.D. Jones (listed as unidentified in the text), Blanch Caldwell and Melvin Barrow, Clyde's brother. Crawford County Sheriff Albert Maxey claimed Clyde and Melvin Barrow "shot and killed Marshal Henry Humphrey while he was trying to arrest them on a robbery charge and on the next day, June 24th, they went to the home of Mrs. Frank Rogers, tried to take her auto, and raped her."
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    Clyde Barrow, left, is shown in an undated photo with an associate, W.D. Jones, who later detailed crimes and killings Barrow committed in his company in a legal statement after his capture. In the Nov. 18, 1933 statement, also <A HREF=http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78938/m1/1/ target="external">online</a>, he claimed to be 17 years old and said he had known Barrow for 11 years.
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    A 1933 "Wanted for Murder" poster for Clyde Champion Barrow and his brother, Melvin Ivan Barrow, offers rewards for their arrests and conviction. "On April 13, 1933, these men shot and killed Detective Harry McGinnis and Constable J.W. Harryman at Joplin, Missouri," the poster says.
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    Dallas Police fingerprint card for Clyde Champion Barrow from 1934 that declares him "WANTED FOR MURDER AND ROBBERY" and adds, "THIS MAN IS HEAVILY ARMED AND VERY DANGEROUS." He is described as standing 5-foot-7, weighing 140 pounds, with hazel eyes and dark blond (reddish) hair.
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    This previously unreleased April 1, 1934, photo shows the scene near Grapevine, Texas, where two motorcycle patrolmen, E.B. Wheeler and H.D. Murphy, were shot and killed, allegedly by Barrow Gang members.
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    Clyde Champion Barrow, left, Henry Methvin, center, and Raymond Hamilton, right, are shown in an undated photo.
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    A typo-riddled telegram from Clyde Barrow to "Mr. King" at the Dallas District Attorney's Office postmarked May 14, 1934, in which Barrow denounces his former associate, Raymond Hamilton, signs off as "Clyde" and includes a fingerprint "just to let you know thjis is on the leve;." "So Raymond Hamilton never killed anybody. If he can make a jury believe that I8m willing to come in and be tryed my self," Barrow writes. "He wrote his lawyer he was too good for me and didnt go my pace, well it makes a me sick to see a yellow punk like that playing baby ad making a jury cry over him."
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow stand next to each other behind a car in an undated photo.
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    The first page of a poem by Bonnie Parker that portrays the Bonnie and Clyde saga in a heroic light. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;It begins:<br/> "You have read the story of Jesse James,<br/> of how he lived and died.<br/> If you are still in need of something to read<br/> here is the story of Bonnie and Clyde."<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;It ends on page 2:<br/> "Some day they will go down together<br/> and they will bury them side by side,<br/> to a few it means grief,<br/> to the law it is relief,<br/> but it is death to Bonnie and Clyde."<br/>
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    Bonnie and Clyde died in a hail of bullets directed at their car, shown here after the shooting on May 23, 1934, in Arcadia, Louisiana.
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
  • Bonnie and Clyde SlideShow

    Clyde Barrow's body is shown in an unidentified morgue.
    Courtesy Dallas Municipal Archives
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