Courtesy Habitat for Humanity
  • Rebuilding Haiti

    With 1.3 million people still homeless in Haiti, there is a desperate need for permanent shelter to replace the tent cities that have sprung up after the quake. Habitat for Humanity has developed plans for "core housing" in Haiti -- small, durable buildings that could house a family of 5.
    Courtesy Habitat for Humanity
  • Rebuilding Haiti

    The single-room homes are designed to withstand earthquakes, constructed with steel beams and cinderblocks.
    Courtesy Habitat for Humanity
  • Rebuilding Haiti

    Each permanent home is built with expansion in mind. The house is designed to be doubled in size when the family is ready to build.
    Courtesy Habitat for Humanity
  • Rebuilding Haiti

    Representatives from the Haitian government and faculty and staff at the University of Miami School of Architecture have developed concepts for rebuilding that would change the fabric of the country. Acknowledging that many Haitians have fled Port-au-Prince for rural villages, they've developed strategies for development to support and embrace that population shift.
    Courtesy Haiti Charrette, University of Miami School of Architecture
  • Rebuilding Haiti

    Habitat for Humanity estimates that each home would cost anywhere from $4,000 to $6,000.
    Courtesy Habitat for Humanity
  • Rebuilding Haiti

    "The town square, at many different scales, would be beneficial to the society," said Dean Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Dean of the University of Miami's School of Architecture. She and the Haitian government see opportunity in the disaster to improve the country.
    Courtesy Haiti Charrette, University of Miami School of Architecture
  • Rebuilding Haiti

    The team also acknowledged the need for housing that could be built quickly within Port-au-Prince. This concept shows a home that could be constructed on a cement slab.
    Courtesy Haiti Charrette, University of Miami School of Architecture
  • Rebuilding Haiti

    Overview of a concept for a single-family home.
    Courtesy Haiti Charrette, University of Miami School of Architecture
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus