New Home Heartbreak: Homeowners Share Nightmare Stories

An ABC News investigation documents complaints from new homeowners alleging shoddy construction.
2:03 | 11/16/16

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Transcript for New Home Heartbreak: Homeowners Share Nightmare Stories
Next, to your money this evening, and to the bitter disappointment some new homeowners discover after the biggest purchase of their lives. ABC's chief investigative correspondent Brian Ross tonight, teaming up with our ABC stations around the country with this your money investigation. Reporter: The building boom in new homes has also left a trail of heartbreak. The water would start here and travel along the ceiling. Reporter: As the owners of brand new houses tell our stations across the country, they are the victims of low quality, shoddy construction. You continue living in something that no one can give you answers for, no one will fix it. Reporter: Problems big and small. Look at that. Reporter: Like black mold. Bouncy floors that had to be ripped up. Cracks and homes in the foundation, with snakes moving in. Settlement cracks, nail pops, paint issues. Issues with the flooring. Reporter: The building industry says its homes are of the highest quality ever, and that on happy homeowners are in the minority. The American consumer expects a perfect home. There is no such thing as a perfect home. Reporter: In fact, our investigation found the biggest building company, D.R. Horton, set aside more than $400 million this year alone to deal with construction defect claims. Point out all the houses here where there are issues. But residents at this subdivision outside Washington, D.C. Say the company has been slow to fix what they say has gone wrong. I had 23 appointments and they missed 17 of those. Reporter: In other cases, repair crews and bulldozers showed up only after ABC news or our stations began to investigation the homeowners' claims. The crews showing up after you started looking into this. So, you'll stay on this. Reporter: Absolutely. This can cost new homeowners tens of thousands of dollars, but you have simple tips on how to protect yourself. Reporter: Absolutely. The best advice, first, spend the money to hire a home inspector to look for flaws and defects, and then make sure to get a good lawyer to look over the contract with the builders so your dream house doesn't turn into a nightmare. David? Our thanks to you, Brian and to all of our stations tonight. There is much more more

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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