Las Vegas shooting leads to 1st signs of movement in gun control stalemate

Democrats, Republicans and the NRA agree that something needs to change when it comes to the regulation of bump stocks.
2:50 | 10/05/17

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Transcript for Las Vegas shooting leads to 1st signs of movement in gun control stalemate
After the massacre took 58 lives, could there be buy partisan movement now on this in Washington? The growing call tonight to ban or regulate those so-called bump stocks. The device used by the gunman, attaching it to some of his weapons, turning semiautomatic weapons to fire like an automatic. Democrats, some Republicans and a signal today from the NRA on this? Here's ABC's senior white house correspondent Cecilia Vega. Reporter: From the nation's most powerful gun lobby, today, a call for change in the wake of the nation's deadliest mass shooting. Found on a dozen of the las Vegas shooter's weapons, those bump stock attachments that allow a rifle to fire like a machine gun. The NRA now says, "Devices to designed to allow semiautomatic rifles to function like fully automatic rifles should be subject to additional regulations." And tonight, a growing number of top Republicans say they would consider legislation banning bump stocks altogether. If this is a modification to a firearm that breaches the spirit of the law against automatic weapons, then I think there would be bipartisan support to deal with it. Clearly, that's something we need to look into. Reporter: One Florida Republican congressman even vowing to introduce his own bill with a bump stock, assault rifles can fire hundreds of rounds per minute, changing a gun from this to this. But not all Republicans are onboard with tougher laws. I don't think the 80 or 90 million Americans who exercise their second amendment rights to own a gun should be punished for the act of one evil person. Reporter: The white house, so far silent on gun control in the wake of the Las Vegas massacre, but late today, president trump signaled he'll be weighing in on the bump stock debate, too. We'll be looking into that over the next short period of time. All right, Cecilia Vega live from 2 white house. The president saying he will look into what can be done. I want to ask you about another report breaking tonight, involving the white house chief of staff. Reports in politico that John Kelly's phone might have been compromis compromised? Reporter: Yeah, David, this report says that general Kelly's personal cell phone was compromised. No indication of how of by whom or if any data may have been accessed. The white house tonight tells us that the general's phone stopped working in December, so, he stopped using it then. This is before he even joined this administration, but David, definitely raising questions about whether any sensitive info may have been accessed. All right, Cecilia Vega tonight, thank you. And we should mention, back on the Las Vegas massacre, that ABC news and "20/20" will air a special documentary presentation tomorrow night with first person accounts and video on the heroism amid the tragedy. "What happened in Vegas" taairs tomorrow at 10:00. We hope you'll watch. In the meantime, overseas

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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