Paternity Fight in the Big Leagues

Major League Baseball player chooses his new baby over the game.
3:00 | 04/03/14

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

More information on this video
Enhanced full screen
Explore related content
Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Paternity Fight in the Big Leagues
national argument raging today. Ignited after a baseball player chose his new baby over going to the game. Most new dads take only a small part of paternity leave. And they feel pressure to rush back to work. So, tonight, ABC's Paula Faris, has the dad that started the giant debate. Reporter: In the opening week of major league baseball -- The 1-2, to Murphy. And he drives a base hit. Reporter: Mets player, Daniel Murphy, missing two games for the birth of his first child, Noah. It felt like the right decision to make. Reporter: And it opened up a major controversy on sports radio. You're a major league baseball player. You can hire a nurse. I mean, you're going to sit there and look at your wife in the hospital bed for two days. Reporter: Football great, boomer esiason, adding to the storm on his radio show. I would say c-section before the season starts. I need to be at opening day. Reporter: But major league baseball players negotiated three days of paid maternity leave. And companies like bank of America, and General Mills offer paid time off for dads. Facebook, as much as 16 weeks. But according to a Boston college survey, 75% of men took less than a week off, no matter what their employers offered. Why? Many men fear taking time off work, afraid of losing status. Being seen as less dedicated. Even ridiculed. But here at the ballpark, that's a chance that Daniel Murphy was being to take. I get that choice. We discussed it. And we felt the best thing for our family was for me to try to stay. Reporter: The modern American family, knocking age-old stereotypes out of the park. It's 2014. It's not 1944. You're not sweating in a waiting room, waiting to hand out cigars. Better families. Better husbands. Better fathers. Reporter: Paula Faris, ABC news, New York. And we congratulate the Murphy family.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":23184907,"title":"Paternity Fight in the Big Leagues","duration":"3:00","description":"Major League Baseball player chooses his new baby over the game.","section":"WNT","mediaType":"Default"}