Superstorm Sandy Victims Vote in 2012 Election

Linsey Davis discusses how displaced voters are managing to vote.
3:00 | 11/06/12

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Transcript for Superstorm Sandy Victims Vote in 2012 Election
flashlights, family suffering after sandy a. As you know vowed unbroken to vote. Linsey davis tells us what they're facing tonight. Reporter: Without power, but not power-less. In some of the areas most devastated by hurricane sandy, we saw images like this of the victims, eager to show with everything they lost, they still have a voice. In rockaway park, queens, when the generators ran out of gas, voters had to cast ballots in the dark. Some new jersey voters climbed into winnebagos to cast their ballots. Overwhelmed by applications, state officials there extended the deadline for casting votes by e-mail until friday. Hard-hit staten island residents are still trying to catch their breath. Did you get a chance to vote today? Vote. No. Look at this. Who's got time to vote? Reporter: Now with the added burden of another storm on the way, expected to hit tomorrow night, this devastated coastline is in the bull's-eye of a nor'easter bringing rain, high winds, coastal flooding, even snow to an already battered region. We could have some snow on the ground and certainly snow on the trees. That makes the trees that already have their bases flooded more likely to fall over. This is the new york city police department. Reporter: New york city is prepping again urging residents in the lowest lying areas to move out of the storm's path ago as parks, playgrounds and beaches are expected to close for 24 hours beginning at noon tomorrow. New jersey officials are watching the path of the storm closely. Just when I thought I was going to start to get some more sleep we're going to get the nor'easter and I think it's going to be all hands on deck again. How much more can we take? Reporter: At the peak of the power outages, more than 8.5 million people were without power. Today, close to a million are still in the dark. And now the fear is that those who just got their power back may lose it again. Why does it always happen we get creamed with a storm and then two days later there's another storm? Reporter: Elinda restaina, a mother of seven, is trying to work fast to salvage what she can before the next round of rain and wind. You can take our home but you can't take our heart. Reporter: Linsey davis, abc news, staten island.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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