Women Endure Surprising Bias in the Workplace

When interviewing for a job, men and women might behave the same but get treated differently.
3:00 | 12/11/13

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Transcript for Women Endure Surprising Bias in the Workplace
We have news about women in the workplace, the day after the first woman became a ceo of a big auto company. The hard fact is that women run only four percent of companies in the fortune 500. A new study shows almost twice as many women as men say they've been turned down for a job because of their sex. Is there a way to capture what is happening on tape, looking at two people in a job interview, the only difference their gender? Here's abc's cecilia vega. Reporter: He's the boss, she's bossy. The negative way women are perceived in the office, in a new ad for pantene that's gone viral. It's eight a -- hit a nerve. So we set out to find the truth. Are women who act exactly the same as men seen differently? Listen to this woman -- how do you feel about her as a job candidate? I know the windows operating system like the back of my hand no problem. Reporter: Now listen to him. I know the windows operating system like the back of my hand no problem. Reporter: The candidates in these videos are actors in a yale university hiring experiment. The resumes and interviews identical. Reporter: The only difference is gender, but when it comes to who got the job? I thought the male applicant had better soft skills. I'd say the woman was arrogant and overselling. Reporter: In hundreds of evaluations, the female job seekers come off as more aggressive. They're rated less likable and they're less likely to be hired. Isn't it a catch 22? You're supposed to be strong to get the job, but you're saying if you're too strong you won't get it. You need to behave in this dominant way to advance as a woman in the workplace but you're seen negatively because that's not how we expect women to behave. Reporter: And if you think this is just male bias, it's not. Both men and women doing the hiring made this same call. I think there's a level of arrogance that might be ok to be a manager, but then there's a step above and I thought she was slightly above that. Reporter: And when we revealed the study results. I was surprised by my reaction. What does that say about us? We have a long way to go. Reporter: A science experiment with real life lessons about who gets the job, who gets passed over, and why. Cecilia vega, abc news, new haven, connecticut.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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