Bill Cosby, Lawyer React to 'Innuendos'

Get the latest in the embattled comedian's week.

ByMichael Rothman and Michael S. James
November 21, 2014, 10:54 PM

— -- Bill Cosby briefly addressed the "innuendos" about him before a performance in Melbourne, Florida, this evening, and his lawyer released a statement denouncing what he described as the media's focus on "fantastical stories" in which women have accused the comedian of sexual abuse.

Cosby spoke briefly to Florida Today before this evening's show, denouncing an alleged call by a radio station to heckle his performance and explaining his recent silence on the accusations against him.

"I know people are tired of me not saying anything, but a guy doesn't have to answer to innuendos," he said. “People should fact check. People shouldn't have to go through that and shouldn't answer to innuendos."

In addition, Cosby's lawyer, Martin D. Singer, made the following statement to ABC News:

“The new, never-before-heard claims from women who have come forward in the past two weeks with unsubstantiated, fantastical stories about things they say occurred 30, 40, or even 50 years ago have escalated far past the point of absurdity.

"These brand new claims about alleged decades-old events are becoming increasingly ridiculous, and it is completely illogical that so many people would have said nothing, done nothing, and made no reports to law enforcement or asserted civil claims if they thought they had been assaulted over a span of so many years.

"Lawsuits are filed against people in the public eye every day. There has never been a shortage of lawyers willing to represent people with claims against rich, powerful men, so it makes no sense that not one of these new women who just came forward for the first time now ever asserted a legal claim back at the time they allege they had been sexually assaulted.

"This situation is an unprecedented example of the media’s breakneck rush to run stories without any corroboration or adherence to traditional journalistic standards. Over and over again, we have refuted these new unsubstantiated stories with documentary evidence, only to have a new uncorroborated story crop up out of the woodwork. When will it end?

"It is long past time for this media vilification of Mr. Cosby to stop."

On Thursday evening, Cosby took the stage in the Bahamas for a women's charity event and, despite opening the show on a personal note, he didn't comment on the recent sexual abuse allegations against him.

Cosby began the show at the Atlantis Resort with stories of his life growing up in the housing projects in Philadelphia, followed by an evening of laughter and applause. He never commented or alluded to the allegations by several women that he drugged and raped or sexually abused them, some of their stories dating back as far as five decades ago.

The audience not only enjoyed Cosby's set, but some defended him.

"It's sad that somebody so famous can be brought down, you know, by this," a member of the audience told ABC.

The women's group that organized the event, The Links Inc., addressed having Cosby perform amid all the accusations.

"Recent accusations against Bill Cosby are alarming and unsettling," the group told ABC News. "Being that no formal charges have been filed against Mr. Cosby, we therefore don't deem it appropriate to further comment on the accusations."

This performance ended a week in which several women have stepped forward with the abuse allegations.

Today, Therese Serignese opened up to "20/20" about her experience with Cosby when she was 19 years old visiting Las Vegas in 1976.

After one of his shows, Serignese said Cosby handed her pills and said, "Take these."

Serignese remembers "feeling drugged" as the two were having sex.

Cosby's attorneys told ABC News overnight that two women who came forward with allegations Thursday are simply accusers "coming out of the woodwork with fabricated or unsubstantiated stories."

Cosby, who has never been criminally charged in connection with the allegations and has repeatedly denied them in the past, was first publicly accused of assault 10 years ago, in 2004. The allegations have gained attention in recent weeks as a number of women have come forward.

Prior to Singer’s statement, John P. Schmitt, another of Cosby's lawyer, posted a notice this past Sunday to the comedian's website, saying Cosby would not be addressing "decade-old, discredited allegations.”

"The fact that they are being repeated does not make them true," Schmitt said in the statement. "There will be no further statement from Mr. Cosby or any of his representatives."

ABC News’ Robert Zepeda contributed to this report.

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