Chernobyl Survivor to Be Pushed in Team Hoyt Wheelchair for Boston Marathon

Alosha O'Brien, 30, will be pushed 26.2 miles for his second Boston Marathon.

"Your dreams can be true," O'Brien told ABC News. "You have to believe instead of always thinking negatively. There are people around the world, so many, that are nice."

To O'Brien, the Hoyts are celebrities, he said.

"They are just inspiring at what they do," O'Brien said, adding that he met them last year. "To me, they're amazing."

O'Brien, who is often approached by strangers who know his name, has become a celebrity in his own right, but he said Welton is the real hero.

"It's not the easiest to run 26.2 miles, especially pushing a chair," he said. "He’s a great guy because... he can make things happen and believes that yes, you can do it. And there's no answer that you can't."

Welton told ABC News the two of them have run three marathons together so far because they needed to qualify for each Boston Marathon. They talk the whole time, and O'Brien plays music from his iPod on speakers attached to the chair. The first time they approached a big hill, Welton said he'll never forget when O'Brien changed the song to "Eye of the Tiger."

"It was hysterical," he said. "Everyone running around us is just laughing. It made it easier for all the other runners."

Welton said the race is a great opportunity for O'Brien to show the world that being different isn't a bad thing. "He's a great example of what people with disabilities are capable of doing if given the opportunity," he said.

Top Stories

Top Stories

Top Stories

Top Stories

ABC News Live

ABC News Live

24/7 coverage of breaking news and live events