Most Googled Calorie Counts of 2014

PHOTO: The most searched calorie counts of 2014.Getty Images
The most searched calorie counts of 2014.

Google users were mighty curious about how many calories they were eating this year, but they were more curious about some foods than others. Check out the top trending calorie count searches of 2014.

And because we're super nice, we pulled together the answers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's calorie search tool.

1. How many calories in a banana? 105.

2. How many calories in pumpkin pie? There are 374 calories in one piece of pie.

PHOTO: There are 374 calories in one piece of pumpkin pie.Getty Images
There are 374 calories in one piece of pumpkin pie.

3. How many calories in an apple? 72.

4. How many calories in an egg? That depends. If it’s boiled, it’s 77 calories. If it’s poached, it’s 71 calories. If it’s fried in butter, it’s 92 calories. If it’s raw, it’s only 63 calories.

PHOTO: How many calories in an egg?Getty Images
How many calories in an egg?

5. How many calories in an avocado? A cup of avocado cubes is 240 calories.

6. How many calories in a cheeseburger? A homemade basic cheeseburger is 317 calories. A cheeseburger on a bun with 1/3 pounds of meat, mayo and a tomato is 845 calories.

7. How many calories in a Big Mac? A Big Mac, McDonald’s double cheeseburger with mayo on a double-decker bun, is 585 calories. According to the McDonald’s website, however, it’s 530 calories.

PHOTO: A McDonalds Big Mac value meal a arranged in New York on July 23, 2010.Jin Lee/Bloomberg/Getty Images
A McDonald's Big Mac value meal a arranged in New York on July 23, 2010.

8. How many calories in a watermelon? A cup of diced watermelon is 46 calories.

9. How many calories in an orange? 62.

10. How many calories in a slice of pizza? A slice of regular cheese pizza is 231 calories. It’s 258 for thick crust. If you add meat and vegetables to a slice of regular crust pizza, it’s 272. Do the same to the thick crust and it’s 328.

"I think it is a positive sign in that people maybe are recognizing more how their overall individual intake plays into their body weight an energy balance," said registered dietitian Jamie Pope, who teaches nutrition at the Vanderbilt University School of Nursing in Nashville, Tennessee. Though she said she was surprised to see fruits mixed in with burgers on the list.

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