Indonesian divers recover recorder from Lion Air plane that crashed into Java Sea

PHOTO: In this photo released by Indonesian Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) rescuers inspect debris believed to be from Lion Air passenger jet that crashed off West Java on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. PlayAP
WATCH Indonesian divers recover recorder from Lion Air plane that crashed into Java Sea

Indonesian Navy divers recovered a cockpit voice recorder from a missing Lion Air plane that crashed into the Java Sea in October, killing all 189 people on board, officials said Monday.

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The device, one of two recorders on the jet, could offer insight into the final moments of the fatal flight as investigators search for clues about why the brand-new Boeing 737 Max 8 went down.

It was discovered under 26 feet of mud on the seabed using a high-tech "ping locator," Lt. Col. Agung Nugroho, spokesman for the Indonesian Navy's western fleet, told the Associated Press.

Indonesian Navy Commander Rear Admiral Yudo Margin shows the recovered cockpit voice recorder of Lion Air flight 610 that crashed into the sea in October during a press conference on board of the navy ship KRI Spica in the waters off Tanjung Karawang The Associated Press
Indonesian Navy Commander Rear Admiral Yudo Margin shows the recovered cockpit voice recorder of Lion Air flight 610 that crashed into the sea in October during a press conference on board of the navy ship KRI Spica in the waters off Tanjung Karawang

Investigators now will work to retrieve data from the so-called black box hoping it will contain audio of the pilots' conversations. The plane crashed in waters nearly 98 feet deep on Oct. 29, just after takeoff.

Officials are expected to offer more details at a press conference later today.

"This is good news, especially for us who lost our loved ones," H. Irianto, who lost his son in the crash, told the Associated Press. "Even though we don't yet know the contents of the CVR, this is some relief from our despair."

Search and rescue officials said they lost contact with Lion Air flight JT610 minutes after it left Jakarta, the country's capital. The cockpit data recorder, recovered days three days after, showed that its airspeed indicator had malfunctioned on previous flights.

PHOTO: Indonesia passenger jet with 189 aboard crashes into ocean shortly after takeoff, Oct. 29, 2018. Dien Magno/AP
Indonesia passenger jet with 189 aboard crashes into ocean shortly after takeoff, Oct. 29, 2018.
The recovered cockpit voice recorder of Lion Air flight 610 is kept in a water-filled container on board of Indonesian Navy ship KRI Spica in the waters of Tanjung Karawang, Indonesia, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. Navy divers have recovered the cockpit voi The Associated Press
The recovered cockpit voice recorder of Lion Air flight 610 is kept in a water-filled container on board of Indonesian Navy ship KRI Spica in the waters of Tanjung Karawang, Indonesia, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. Navy divers have recovered the cockpit voi

The 189 on board included three children and the crew, officials said.

Lion Air is one of Indonesia's largest airlines.

In 2013, one of its Boeing 737-800 jets missed the runway while landing in Bali, crashing into the sea, but all 108 people on board survived.

Indonesian airlines in 2007 were barred from flying to Europe because of safety concerns, though several were allowed to resume services in the following decade. That ban was lifted in June, as the U.S. lifted a decade-long ban in 2016.