Tim Flach
  • Tim Flach's new book, "Endangered" hopes to draw attention to the decline of several species of animals across the globe. </br></br>All captions were written by Sam Wells for use in Tim Flach's book "Endangered."
    Tim Flach
  • IUCN White-Bellied Pangolin Threat Level: Vulnerable

    IUCN White-Bellied Pangolin Threat Level: Vulnerable
    A female pangolin gives birth each year to a single baby. There were disturbing reports in 2012 of pangolin farms, established in China to meet rising demand for body parts.
    Tim Flach
  • IUCN Snow Leopard Threat Level: Endangered

    IUCN Snow Leopard Threat Level: Endangered
    A 2016 report from wildlife trade monitoring network TRAFFIC found that, on average, four snow leopards have been killed every week since 2008. Of those, more than half are revenge killings by herders, angry at losing their already-meager income. Another 20-odd percent succumb to poachers (some for their illegally traded fur, others for body parts used in traditional Asian medicines), and a further 20 percent are caught in traps set for other animals. Around four to seven thousand snow leopards survive today.
    Tim Flach
  • IUCN Pied Tamarin Threat Level: Endangered

    IUCN Pied Tamarin Threat Level: Endangered
    The pied tamarin, arguably the most threatened of all the Amazonian primates, is now exposed to the squalid fate of becoming roadkill. A rescue operation mounted by Proyecto de Sauim de Coleira, in partnership with the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, is racing to rescue pied tamarins from the Manaus hinterland for translocation to a safer habitat.
    Tim Flach
  • IUCN Polar Bear Threat Level: Vulnerable

    IUCN Polar Bear Threat Level: Vulnerable
    As the water warms, its oxygen content falls, reducing productivity. Ringed and bearded seals, which make up the bear's main prey, need the ice cover for protection and for pupping. Polar bears can eat whale meat, but they need the seal flesh to maintain their bodyweight, and to keep up their omega-3 fatty acids (or otherwise risk high cholesterol - rather like us). With ever more open, ice-free seas, however, the bears are forced to swim ever greater distances to find an ever-diminishing supply of prey.
    Tim Flach
  • IUCN Saiga Threat Level: Critically Endangered

    IUCN Saiga Threat Level: Critically Endangered
    Hunted for its meat and horns since prehistory, the saiga has proved incredibly resilient. After illegal hunting led to further population plunges, a coalition of governments and NGOs leapt to the saiga's rescue. After a 2015 disease outbreak amoung the species from bacterium Pasteurella multocida, which is not normally lethal, scientists have yet to explain the die-off. One theory is that climate change has weakened the saigas' immune systems.
    Tim Flach
  • IUCN Ploughshare Tortoise Threat Level: Critically Endangered

    IUCN Ploughshare Tortoise Threat Level: Critically Endangered
    Critical predicaments demand urgent measures, as of 2016 a coalition of groups, including the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Wildlife Conservation Society, Turtle Conservancy, Turtle Survival Alliance and Global Wildlife Conservation, pitched a plea to the 17th CITES Conference of Parties (CoP17) to address the declining numbers of Ploughshare tortoises. If the government of Madagascar does not crackdown on illegal trafficking of the ploughshare tortoise, they said, it "will likely go extinct in the wild within the next two years."
    Tim Flach
  • IUCN Monarch Butterflies Threat Level: Not Evaluated

    IUCN Monarch Butterflies Threat Level: Not Evaluated
    In 1976, the World Congress of Entomology set the monarchs' plight as its top priority. These New World wanderers have spread far (they've colonized Spain, Australia, and New Zealand) and, as yet, the species is not endangered. Nonetheless, in 1983, the IUCN took the unprecedented step of creating a new category in the Invertebrate Red Data Book, in order to list the monarch migration as a Threatened Phenomenon. This is because the numbers of American migrants are falling sharply. Figures for 1997-2016 show a 74 percent decline in California's overwintering monarchs.
    Tim Flach
  • IUCN Chalice Coral Threat Level: Least Concern

    IUCN Chalice Coral Threat Level: Least Concern
    A coral takes form when a single polyp attaches to a hard surface and multiplies by budding. The polyps secrete an armature of calcium carbonate, which builds into the skeleton of the colony as successive generations live and die over decades, centuries, millennia. The bleaching that results from the loss of algae is not the only threat posed by climate change; there is also ocean acidification, which has been nicknamed global warming's "evil twin." As seawater absorbs atmospheric carbon dioxide, this produces carbonic acid, which dissolves the coral structures.
    Tim Flach
  • IUCN Philippine Eagle Threat Level: Critically Endangered

    IUCN Philippine Eagle Threat Level: Critically Endangered
    Philippine eagles breed slowly, and fewer than 10 percent of juveniles make it to adulthood, so a captive-breeding program, run by the Philippine Eagle Foundation on Mindanao, gives a vital boost to numbers. Old prejudices, which had seen the bird maligned as a chicken-thief, die hard. Accordingly, the foundation works with schoolteachers on Mindanao to promote positive attitudes, so that the next generation of volunteers will treasure this flagship bird.
    Tim Flach
  • IUCN Common Hippopotamus Threat Level: Vulnerable

    IUCN Common Hippopotamus Threat Level: Vulnerable
    A 2003 survey in the Democratic Republic of the Congo estimated hippo numbers had fallen by 95 percent during eight years of civil war. Today, African elephants outnumber hippos roughly four to one. Hippo teeth are still being smuggled out of several African countries (among them Tanzania, Uganda, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Mozambique), mostly to Hong Kong, where ivory is carved into trinkets. The skin, too, is sought for leatherwork.
    Tim Flach