Teen Tweets Homeless Man's Hand-Written Resume to Help Him Land Work

Aaron O'Dwyer said he couldn't bear seeing a homeless man pass out resumes.

— -- Thanks to Aaron O'Dwyer, a homeless man could potentially land a job after a Twitter post received overwhelming attention from hiring managers in the area.

"I couldn’t just walk past him," O'Dwyer, 18, of Liverpool, England, told ABC News. "It was the right thing to do. I think it was because he was a similar age as myself. You could tell he wasn't on drugs or anything. He was a normal lad.

"It took me 16 seconds to take the resume and post it on Twitter. That’s all it took to get him off the streets. It's quite rewarding for myself. I feel good about it."

O'Dwyer said he was on his way out of a job interview July 14 when he saw a homeless man named Jordan Lockett, 20, sitting on the street.

"I walked up to him and asked if he wanted some money and I gave him some change," he added. "I noticed in his hand he had about 15 to 20 handwritten resumes and he insisted I took one.

"It was quite a sad read and, obviously, a cry for help."

The resume, written on loose-leaf paper read, in part:

Need work Need help Seriously lost

I'm so sick of wasting away now I'm always being told to go to homeless centres [sic] but there [sic] ] not helping

I write my C.Vs like this because I don't have anything to put on it

"It also said that he left school at 13 or 14, left school for his motorbike mechanic training," O'Dwyer said. "He was left with no skills and no grades, so he couldn’t go on to a university. That’s the reason why he said he's on the streets."

O'Dwyer posted a photo of the paper on Twitter, where it quickly racked up over 3,000 retweets and tons of job offers for Lockett.

In addition to businesses in the area, Joe Anderson, the mayor of Liverpool, tweeted that he, too, wanted to help the young man get on his feet.

"Many people for many different reasons fall by the wayside a little help and assistance is often all they need to get them back on track," Anderson said in a statement to ABC News. "Liverpool is a kind-hearted city where we try to help each other, despite real difficult financial times. I believe helping is an invest-to-earn model, it means you stop paying welfare and more importantly it gives a person hope and help in equal measure.

“The response to this young man's plight has been inspiring and I hope he can take up one of the offers of work made to him. A society can and should be judged on how it helps those most in need."

O'Dwyer said that since his tweet took off, he's been in contact with Lockett's brother, Kyle Ravenscroft.

"Last update I have had is that Jordan has got a trial shift at a bar tonight, but I have had loads of generous people contact me with job offers for him," Ravenscroft said. "I can't thank Aaron enough for what he has done for Jordan. Many people would have just ignored it and walked straight past him.

“It's amazing all the support that has come from this, but Jordan is just one out of God knows how many people who are in a similar situation. More really needs to be done to help them."

Ravencroft added that Lockett has found a place to stay and that he plans on reconnecting with him in days to come.