Conservatives defend Mulvaney, call for Trump to make him permanent chief of staff

PHOTO:Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney listens during a cabinet meeting held by President Donald Trump at the White House, Oct. 21, 2019. PlayLeah Millis/Reuters
WATCH Mick Mulvaney admits quid pro quo with Ukraine

A group of prominent conservative activists is rallying behind embattled acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, calling on President Donald Trump to remove the word “acting” from his title.

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Mulvaney has been the “acting” chief of staff of for nearly 10 months and has faced constant speculation about his job security. This letter suggests conservative leaders believe his job may now be in jeopardy and it would be a mistake for president to fire him.

“Conservatives are proud to support the role Mick Mulvaney continues to play in the Trump Administration,” the conservatives write. “He is a proven leader, and an outspoken advocate of conservative principles and policies.”

PHOTO:Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney listens during a cabinet meeting held by President Donald Trump at the White House, Oct. 21, 2019. Leah Millis/Reuters
PHOTO:Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney listens during a cabinet meeting held by President Donald Trump at the White House, Oct. 21, 2019.

“We believe the president should make him permanent in the Chief of Staff role,” the letter, signed by several prominent conservative leaders, including Family Research Council President Tony Perkins and Club for Growth President David McIntosh, said.

Mulvaney has been under fire for saying last week that President Trump did in fact order him to withhold military aid to pressure Ukraine to investigate a widely debunked conspiracy about the computer server used by Democrats in 2016. Mulvaney and the White House have argued that his statements were misinterpreted and that he never admitted to a "quid pro quo."

After reports suggested Trump had discussed replacing Mulvaney with other administration officials the president denied he considered them, but did not specifically say whether he was considering replacing Mulvaney.