Hillary Clinton is not convinced that Donald Trump would be able to change his image, even if he tried.

"Trump keeps saying things like, 'You know, uh, I didn't really mean it. It was all part of my reality TV show. Running for president will be on your screen,'" she said at at a campaign rally in Central Falls, Rhode Island today, impersonating the Republican frontrunner.

"Well, if we buy that, shame on us," she added. "Because he already showed us what he believes, and he has already said what he wants to do, and he wants go after every one of the rights we have."

Earlier this week, Trump's new campaign chief Paul Manafort reassured the Republican National Convention that people should expect a different Trump in the general election. "The negatives will come down. The image is going to change," he said in a private briefing.

"When he's out on the stage, when he's talking about the kinds of things he's talking about on the stump, he's projecting an image that's for that purpose ... you'll start to see more depth of the person, the real person. You’ll see a real different way," he added.

Today, however, Trump himself said he's not "toning it down," and that "everything I say I'm going to do, folks, I'll do."

Meanwhile, Clinton's campaign released a video, called "Extreme Makeover," backing up that claim.

"When someone shows you who they are, believe them," Clinton says at the end of the video, which cuts together clips of Trump's comments on women, immigrants and Muslims.

Speculation over Trump's shifting image escalated this week when the Republican frontrunner came out against North Carolina's new law that bans people from using bathrooms that don't match the sex listed on their birth certificate.

"North Carolina did something that was very strong, and they're paying a big price," he said on "The Today Show," referring to the growing economic boycott against the state.

Ted Cruz, who supports the law, bashed Trump for his comments, citing it as evidence that the former real estate mogul is too politically correct to be the GOP nominee.

"Donald agreed with Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama in attacking the state of North Carolina for passing their bathroom ordinance," Cruz said. "And Donald, on television this morning, said, gosh, he thought that men should be able to go into the girls' bathroom if they want to. Now let me ask you, have we gone stark raving nuts? This is the political correctness."

Clinton opposes the North Carolina law.

"We can't let laws like those passed in North Carolina and Mississippi stand," she said at her rally today, also making a reference to Mississippi's law that allows people to refuse services to people based on religious opposition to same-sex marriage or transgender people.