Kellyanne Conway: I'm Getting Death Threats Fueled by Pro-Clinton Rhetoric

PHOTO: Kellyanne Conway, campaign manager for President-elect Donald Trump, arrives to Trump Tower, Nov. 12, 2016 in New York City. PlayYana Paskova/Getty Images
WATCH Kellyanne Conway on Her Clash With Clinton Aides

Donald Trump senior adviser Kellyanne Conway has blasted the president-elect's critics -- namely Hillary Clinton supporters -- for fueling a barrage of death threats against her.

"Anytime I respond, anytime I defend myself against these ... allegations that are now leading to death threats ... I'm seen as ungracious," Conway said during an interview Thursday on MSNBC with Chris Matthews, referring, in part, to claims that the Trump campaign gave a platform to white nationalists. "Why are we sore winners? I'm not a sore winner. I'm a winner. My guy is a winner. He's the next president of the United States."

Conway also slammed Jen Palmieri, who was communications director for Clinton's presidential campaign, for penning an op-ed in The Washington Post on Thursday in which she claimed the Trump campaign catered to white supremacists.

Palmieri wrote, "I don’t know whether the Trump campaign needed to give a platform to white supremacists to win. But the campaign clearly did, and it had the effect of empowering the white-nationalist movement."

The Washington Post also ran a piece written by editorial board member Jonathan Capeheart titled, "Yes, Kellyanne Conway, you did provide a platform for white supremacy."

When asked by MSNBC's Matthews if the back-and-forth accusations are "going to end," Conway cited the Post pieces, as well as the death threats.

"Ask Jen Palmieri that because she's writing an op-ed, somebody else in The Washington Post today has a scathing headline about me which is not true but did lead to some death threats today and that'll be on their doorstep."

Conway added, "The fact is that [the Trump] campaign ran a race where we reached into those working class voters who felt they were the forgotten man or forgotten woman, they were the base of our support," she said. "All [the Hillary Clinton campaign] needed to do was have a compelling, sticky, aspirational message for the American people....all I heard was 'We're not Donald Trump. That's not a message."

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