Melania Trump Takes the Stage and Sings Donald's Praises at the RNC

PHOTO: Melania Trump, wife of Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump walks to the stage during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, July 18, 2016. PlayJ. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo
WATCH Melania Trump: 'Donald Wants Prosperity for All Americans'

There are few people that can cut Donald Trump off. One appears to be his wife Melania.

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Rather than wait until the final day of the Republican convention like most presidential candidates, Trump first addressed the crowd in Cleveland tonight before his wife took the stage.

And unlike at many of Trump’s campaign rallies -- and even the announcement of his own vice president -- Trump kept his comments short as planned ahead of Melania’s speech.

“We are going to win so big, thank you very much,” Trump said during his remarks, which only lasted about a minute.

Melania then took the stage and used the speech to both introduce herself to voters and sing her husband’s praises.

She touched on her upbringing in Slovenia, “a small, beautiful and then communist country in Central Europe,” her “elegant and hard-working mother,” and her father’s impact on her “passion for business and travel.”

“After living and working in Milan and Paris, I arrived in New York City 20 years ago, and I saw both the joys and the hardships of daily life,” the former model said.

She joined the crowd in applauding her declaration that becoming an American citizen was “the greatest privileged on planet Earth.”

Melania speaks five languages, and reportedly spent the weekend practicing her speech in New Jersey.

She used the latter half of her speech to help touch on topics that have been sometimes controversial for her husband.

“Donald intends to represent all the people, not just some of the people. That includes Christians and Jews and Muslims, it includes Hispanics and African Americans and Asians, and the poor and the middle class.

“The primary season, and its toughness, is behind us…. The race will be hard-fought, all the way to November,” she said.

“It would not be a Trump contest without excitement and drama,” she added.