Obama hits campaign trail for midterms final stretch. First stop, Georgia

He'll also visit Michigan, Wisconsin and Nevada.

October 28, 2022, 10:40 PM

Former President Barack Obama offered a hopeful message for voters as he headlined a rally, hosted by Georgia Democrats, with Sen. Raphael Warnock and gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams.

"Even in our darkest moments, and there have been darker moments in this country before, we have always had more in common than our politics suggest," Obama said.

"Even when times are tough, what unites us has always been stronger than what divides us."

PHOTO: ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 28: Former President Barack Obama speaks at a campaign event for Georgia Democrats on October 28, 2022 in College Park, Georgia.  (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 28: Former President Barack Obama speaks at a campaign event for Georgia Democrats on October 28, 2022 in College Park, Georgia. Obama is in Georgia in support of Democratic candidates, encouraging voters to turn out. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Democrats hope to use Obama's popularity within the party to motivate their base as polls show a tightening race between Sen. Raphael Warnock and Herschel Walker, and Stacey Abrams trails GOP Gov. Brian Kemp.

As the former President sought to energize Georgians he cautioned: "Resist the temptation to give up."

“I get why you might be worried. I understand why it might be tempting sometimes to tune out. But I’m here to tell you that tuning out is not an option."

Former President Barack Obama raises hands with Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams and Sen. Raphael Warnock (D-GA) at a campaign event for Georgia Democrats on October 28, 2022 in Georgia.  (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 28: Former President Barack Obama raises hands with Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams and Sen. Raphael Warnock (D-GA) at a campaign event for Georgia Democrats on October 28, 2022 in College Park, Georgia. Obama is in Georgia in support of Democratic candidates, encouraging voters to turn out. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Acknowledging the issues at the forefront of this election such as abortion and inflation, Obama said this election was about morality.

"The fundamental question that you should be asking yourself this who will fight for you? Who cares about you? Who sees you? Who believes in you? That's the choice in this election," Obama said.

Though he added, "Democracy is on the ballot" before slamming Republicans for putting the basic foundation of democracy in to question and going after people's personal freedoms.

"Some of these folks in the GOP politicians, judges who think they can get to decide when you start a family or how many children you have. Who you marry? Who you love?" Obama said to boos.

"Don't boo, vote," Obama said, delivering his more famous catchphrases.

"All these Democratic leaders who believe that the freedom to make these personal, intimate decisions belong to every American, not politicians in Washington."

Obama also argued if Republicans win control of Congress they will start going after people's freedoms.

"It's a reminder that history doesn't just move forward, they can go back," Obama said. "We could be one presidential election away from a nationwide ban on access to abortion. And that might just be the beginning."

He then went more direct, going after GOP Senate nominee and former football star Herschel Walker multiple times Friday.

"Herschel Walker was a heck of a football player...one of the best running backs of all time. But here's the question, Does that make him the best person to represent you in the US Senate?" Obama questioned.

"Does that make him equipped to weigh in on the critical decisions about our economy, and our foreign policy and our future?"

Obama then joked about how you wouldn't ask Walker to fly a plane just because he was a Heisman trophy winner.

"Seems to me he's a celebrity who wants to be a politician and we've seen how that goes," he said, taking swipes at both Walker and former President Donald Trump.

PHOTO: Former President Barack Obama attends an event at the White House in Washington, April 5, 2022.
Former President Barack Obama attends an event at the White House in Washington, April 5, 2022.
The Washington Post via Getty Images, FILE

As he helped Democrats deliver their closing message, Obama ended with a positive tone, saying Democrats are still worth fighting for.

"Democrats aren't perfect. I'm the first one to admit it. Politicians just like all of us can make mistakes. But right now with a few notable exceptions most of the GOP and a whole bunch of these candidates are not even pretending that the rules apply to them anymore."

Obama ended by saying, although problems may not be fixed overnight, "better is worth fighting for."

"If enough of us, make our voices heard, I promise, things will get better. We will heal what ails us. We will restore our democracy. We will build a country that is more fair and more just and more equal and more free. That's our task. That's our responsibility. Let's go do it," Obama closed to thunderous applause.

In the coming weeks, he will also visit Michigan, Wisconsin and Nevada to stump for Democrats.

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