Matt York/AP Photo
  • The Current Air Force One Plane

    The Current Air Force One Plane
    President Barack Obama arrives at Love Field Airport, Nov. 6, 2013, in Dallas on one of two identical, highly-customized Boeing VC-25 aircraft in the U.S. Air Force fleet. The plane with tail number 29000 -- known commercially as a 747-200 -- flew its first presidential mission in March 1991. 
    Tony Gutierrez/AP Photo
  • President Obama Has Flown 1 Million Miles

    President Obama Has Flown 1 Million Miles
    President Barack Obama arrives on Air Force One at Sky Harbor International Airport, March 13, 2015, in Phoenix.  Obama has visited 48 states and 49 countries aboard the plane, flying more than 1.1 million miles since taking office, according to the U.S. Air Force. 
    Matt York/AP Photo
  • FDR First Airborne US President

    FDR First Airborne US President
    President Franklin Delano Roosevelt is seen on board a Boeing 314 Clipper aircraft returning to the United States after the Casablana Conference, circa 1945. Roosevelt was the first American president to be transported by aircraft, starting in 1943. 
    Fox Photos/Getty Images
  • 'Sacred Cow' First Official Presidential Plane

    'Sacred Cow' First Official Presidential Plane
    The Douglas VC-54C "Sacred Cow," seen here at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, became the first official presidential airplane in 1944. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was the first president to use the "Sacred Cow" in 1945 just before he died. The plane features an elevator that would lift FDR in his wheelchair aboard the plane.
    U.S. Air Force
  • Plane Becomes 'Air Force One' Under Eisenhower

    Plane Becomes 'Air Force One' Under Eisenhower
    President Dwight D. Eisenhower talks with his advisors on board Air Force One while flying to Turkey, Dec. 1, 1959. The president plane received its radio call sign "Air Force One" in the mid-1950s. 
    Paul Schutzer/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images
  • Presidential Prop Plane Becomes Trainer for Parachuters

    Presidential Prop Plane Becomes Trainer for Parachuters
    The Aero Commander U-4B, seen here at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, was used by President Eisenhower from 1956 - 1960. Once the plane was decommissioned it was sent to the Air Force Academy to help cadets with parachute training.
    U.S. Air Force
  • The First Presidential Helicopter

    The First Presidential Helicopter
    <p> The Bell UH-13J Sioux, seen here at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, is the first helicopter to transport an American president. Dwight Eisenhower became the first commander-in-chief to fly in a chopper. In 1962, the UH-13 was retired from presidential service and later used to transport high-ranking dignitaries.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p>
    U.S. Air Force
  • Kennedy Inaugurates Presidential Jet Travel

    Kennedy Inaugurates Presidential Jet Travel
    President John F. Kennedy and wife, Jacqueline Kennedy, wave goodbye from the doorway of Air Force One as they prepare to embark for Vienna, June 4, 1961. The first presidential jet -- the Boeing 707 -- entered service during the Kennedy administration.&nbsp;
    AP Photo
  • Boeing Is Jet of Choice for US Presidents

    Boeing Is Jet of Choice for US Presidents
    A Boeing VC-137C, also known as the 707, was used as Air Force One for three more decades and serviced seven presidents after John F. Kennedy, before being retired in 1998. The jet, seen here landing at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, was the first presidential aircraft painted blue and white instead from the standard military colors.
    U.S. Air Force
  • Air Force One Carries Kennedy's Casket

    Air Force One Carries Kennedy's Casket
    Lyndon Johnson takes the oath of office aboard Air Force One after President Kennedy's assassination in Texas. &nbsp;Former First Lady Jackie Kennedy, right, looks on with Lady Bird Johnson, Jack Valenti and Congressman Albert Thomas, Nov. 22, 1963. &nbsp;Kennedy's casket was also on board.&nbsp;
    Gamma-Keystone/Getty Images
  • LBJ Used Aircraft to Visit Texas Ranch

    LBJ Used Aircraft to Visit Texas Ranch
    The twin-engine Beech VC-6A entered service in 1966 to transport Lyndon B. Johnson and his family to and from their Texas ranch.&nbsp; Whenever the president was aboard, it received the call sign &quot;Air Force One.&quot; &nbsp;The plane is now on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.&nbsp;
    U.S. Air Force
  • Nixon Flew Historic Missions Aboard Air Force One

    Nixon Flew Historic Missions Aboard Air Force One
    <p> President Richard Nixon gestures as he talks with Secretary of State William Rogers, left, and National Security adviser Henry Kissinger, July 18, 1971, as they returned from San Clemente, Calif., to Washington aboard Air Force One. Nixon flew several historic missions aboard the plane, including the groundbreaking first presidential visit to the People's Republic of China in 1972.&nbsp;</p>
    AP Photo
  • Air Force One Not Always Jumbo

    Air Force One Not Always Jumbo
    The Lockheed VC-140B Jetstar was used to transport several presidents including Nixon, Ford, Carter and Reagan. The plane was decommissioned in 1987 and is seen here at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.
    U.S. Air Force
  • Presidents Behind the Scenes

    Presidents Behind the Scenes
    On-board Air Force One, President Ford poses with Candice Bergen, who was on a photo assignment for Ladies' Home Journal, Feb. 4, 1975 in Atlanta. More than 60 photographers had turns at exclusive access to Ford during his time in office, but none created a bigger stir than the famous Ms.Bergen, who was also the first female photographer to shoot a behind-the-scenes story on an American president.
    David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images
  • Presidents, Press Share Cabin Space

    Presidents, Press Share Cabin Space
    President Jimmy Carter and press secretary Jody Powell, right, chat with reporters while standing in the aisle of Air Force One prior to landing at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, Oct. 20, 1979. Carter was returning to Washington after attending the dedication of the John F. Kennedy presidential library in Boston, Mass.&nbsp;
    Charles Tasnadi/AP Photo
  • The Flying Oval Office

    The Flying Oval Office
    President Ronald Reagan talks to one of his aides on-board Air Force One during his re-election campaign, June 1, 1984, over Texas. One of the two retired Boeing VC-137C aircraft used as Air Force One now resides at the Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif. &nbsp;
    Robert R McElroy/Getty Images
  • Airborne Presidential Press Briefings

    Airborne Presidential Press Briefings
    President George H.W. Bush holds a news conference aboard Air Force One as he flies between college commencements speeches in Mississippi, May 13, 1989. Bush urged the people of Defense Forces of Panama to drive Gen. Manuel Noriega from power. &nbsp;Bush inaugurated the current fleet of presidential jet aircraft, which entered service in 1990.&nbsp;
    Marcy Nighswander/AP Photo
  • Smaller Presidential Planes for Smaller Airports

    Smaller Presidential Planes for Smaller Airports
    President Bill Clinton waves as he and daughter Chelsea Clinton disembark from Air Force One after arriving in Queenstown, New Zealand, Sept. 14, 1999. The U.S. Air Force regularly employs smaller jets in the fleet to transport the president to small airports with shorter runways unable to accommodate a Boeing 747. &nbsp;
    Greg Gibson/AP Photo
  • Reporters Rarely See the President On-Board

    Reporters Rarely See the President On-Board
    President Bill Clinton and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton share a box of Valentine's Day chocolates with Ann Compton of ABC News, right, and other members of the press corps aboard Air Force One, Feb. 14, 1999. The Clintons were on their way for a two-day visit with Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo in Merida, Mexico. Presidents rarely visit the press cabin, which is in the far rear of the plane.&nbsp;
    Greg Gibson/AP Photo
  • Secure Calls From the Sky

    Secure Calls From the Sky
    President Bill Clinton speaks on the telephone aboard Air Force One, July 17, 1993, over Missouri. The modified Boeing 747-200 was first used by George H.W. Bush when it entered service in 1990. The plane has state-of-the-art, fully-secure communications equipment, making it a mobile presidential command center. &nbsp;
    Diana Walker/Liaison/Getty Images
  • Safe Haven on 9/11

    Safe Haven on 9/11
    President George W. Bush speaks to Vice President Dick Cheney by phone aboard Air Force One on Sept. 11, 2001. After the attacks in New York City, Pennsylvania and Washington, Bush directed the federal government's initial emergency response from the safety of the skies. &nbsp;Here he is seen after departing Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska.&nbsp;
    Eric Draper/The White House/Getty Images
  • Presidents Fly Together

    Presidents Fly Together
    President Obama and former President George W. Bush turn to joke with White House Doctor Ronny Jackson (off-camera) shortly after they boarded Air Force One for a trip to South Africa, Dec. 9, 2013. Dr. Jackson also worked as a White House physician during the Bush administration. The plane has a medical annex where treatment can be provided to the president, staff and crew.&nbsp;
    Pete Souza/The White House
  • Productivity on the Plane

    Productivity on the Plane
    <p> President Barack Obama signs a bill that will give the Congressional Gold Medal to the foot soldiers who participated in Bloody Sunday in Selma, Ala. &nbsp;Obama flew Air Force One to Alabama on March 7, 2015, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, when civil rights marchers clashed with police during a march to Montgomery.&nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p>
    Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
  • Airborne West Wing

    Airborne West Wing
    President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama join staff aboard Air Force One during their flight, April 3, 2009, from Stansted Airport in Essex, England, en route to Strasbourg, France. The plane can accommodate 102 passengers and crew across its 4,000 square feet of interior floor space.&nbsp;
    Pete Souza
  • Setting Flight Mileage Records

    Setting Flight Mileage Records
    President Barack Obama meets with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton aboard Air Force One during a flight from Stansted Airport in Essex, England, to France on April 3, 2009. &nbsp;Clinton traveled more than 957,000 miles with stops in 112 countries as secretary -- an all-time record. &nbsp;As of April 22, 2015, Obama had flown 1.1 million miles with stops in 49 countries aboard Air Force One.&nbsp;
    Pete Souza
  • Presidential Plane As Campaign Backdrop

    Presidential Plane As Campaign Backdrop
    <p> President Barack Obama speaks in front of Air Force One at a campaign event at Burke Lakefront Airport in Cleveland, Oct. 25, 2012. The event capped a 48-hour, eight-state campaign swing covering 6,500 miles. Obama spent one night on-board the plane as it flew from Nevada to Florida. In Cleveland, the last stop, the plane taxied up to the bleachers and stage with Obama's podium and teleprompter.&nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p>
    Tony Dejak/AP Photo
  • The Future Air Force One

    The Future Air Force One
    The next generation of Air Force One jets will be Boeing-made, the Pentagon says. They will be twin-engine Boeing 747-8 models, an upgrade from the current design that entered service in 1990. &nbsp;The planes are expected to begin carrying the American president in 2023.&nbsp;
    Boeing