What's at Stake in the New York Primary

PHOTO: Bernie Sanders at a presidential primary debate, April 14, 2016, in New York. Hillary Clinton at a campaign rally, April 17, 2016, in Staten Island, New York. Donald Trump speaks at a fundraiser, April 17, 2016. in Staten Island, New York.PlayGetty Images
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One of the biggest primary battles in the presidential election comes to a head tomorrow in New York.

The candidates from both sides have been campaigning throughout the Empire State in an effort to win as many delegates as possible.

Donald Trump is leading his GOP opponents by 33 points while Hillary Clinton has a 13-point edge over Bernie Sanders.

A WNBC/WSJ/Marist poll released April 15 shows Trump with 54 percent support of Republican primary voters. Ohio Gov. John Kasich is in second place with 21 percent and Sen. Ted Cruz with 18 percent.

ABC News political analyst Matt Dowd said that it seems pretty clear that Trump is going to win the state, and he could stand to pick up a sizable amount of the state's 95 delegates.

"If he picks up north of 75 [delegates], he has a real path to 1,237," Dowd said, referring to the number of delegates a Republican nominee is required to win to secure the nomination before the July convention in Cleveland.

"Kasich has a real shot of coming second," Dowd added, noting that such a result would give Kasich "a better argument going forward that people should pay attention to him."

According to recent polls by Baruch College/NY1 News and Quinnipiac, Clinton leads Sanders by 13 points while a Sienna College poll has Clinton up by 10 points.

There are 247 delegates up for grabs for Democrats in New York, making Tuesday's primary a pivotal one.

"This is crucial for both of them," Dowd said. "This is critical for [Sanders] because he needs to reset the race...and the only way for him going forward is to win New York."

"It's crucial for [Clinton] because losing her home state because makes people question is she really the best candidate," he said.

As of today, ABC News estimates that Clinton has a total of 1,758 delegates and Sanders has a total 1,076 delegates. The number of delegates needed to win the Democratic nomination is 2,383.

A new national NBC/WSJ poll released today shows that the gap between the two Democrats is tightening. Clinton has a slight edge over Sanders with 50 percent of support from Democrats, down from 53 percent last month.