5 Takeaways From Donald Trump's '60 Minutes' Interview

The president-elect addresses his campaign promises, post-win.

— -- In his first television interview as president-elect, Donald Trump sounded softer on some of his signature campaign issues, such as reforming Washington and immigration, while taking a hard line on abortion.

Here are some of the headlines from his sit-down interview with CBS News' "60 Minutes."

The Border Wall Could Include a Fence

Trump's promise to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border was a cornerstone of his campaign.

Now, he said he would consider the idea that the wall could be a fence in some parts of the southern border.

"For certain areas I would [consider a fence], but certain areas, a wall is more appropriate," he said. "I'm very good at this, it's called construction."

Members of Congress have suggested the border structure would not always be a literal wall, but a combination of physical and technological defenses.

"There might be technology in certain areas with UAVs [unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones] that can look out 40 miles and give us a better perspective," House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-California, told reporters on Monday.

Same-Sex Marriage "Settled," But Roe v. Wade Could Be Overturned

Trump repeatedly referred to the issue of same-sex marriage as "settled" by the Supreme Court. But as a candidate, he said he would consider appointing judges to the country's highest court that supported overturning it.

In the same interview, he emphasized that he would appoint "pro-life" judges and said the landmark abortion rights decision Roe V. Wade could be overturned.

"If it ever were overturned, it would go back to the states," Trump said.

He Said He Won't Take A Salary

Trump said he will only take a nominal salary of $1 as president.

"I'm not going to take the salary. I'm not taking it," he said.

He Doesn't Want to "Hurt" Clintons With Email Investigation

Trump proposed appointing a special prosecutor to investigate Hillary Clinton's use of a private email as secretary of state if he won the election.

He told "60 Minutes" he is more focused on jobs and healthcare, and "on all of these other things that we've been talking about."

"She did some bad things," Trump said, before adding "I don't want to hurt them. They're, they're good people."

Americans Should Not Fear

Trump also had a message for the thousands of Americans who have demonstrated against his victory since last week: don't fear his presidency.

"Don't be afraid. We are going to bring our country back. But certainly, don't be afraid," he said.

Trump also wondered whether there would have been a "double standard" against his supporters had Clinton won the election.