Trump Campaign Manager Says FBI Review Plays Into Voters' 'Reluctance' About Clinton

PHOTO: Kellyanne Conway appeared on "Good Morning America," Oct. 20, 2016.PlayABC News
WATCH Kellyanne Conway Says FBI Review Plays Into Voters' 'Reluctance' About Clinton

Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway says the FBI's review of newly-found messages in connection to its investigation of Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server could make a difference on Election Day.

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"I think for the voters at this stage, this plays right into their reluctance about Hillary Clinton," Kellyanne Conway told ABC's George Stephanopoulos on "This Week." "There is political currency attached to this."

A new ABC News/Washington Post tracking poll released today shows Clinton and Trump drawing virtually even just nine days before Election Day, with the Democratic nominee leading the Republican candidate by a single point at 46 to 45 percent.

About a third of likely voters in the poll say they are less likely to support Clinton in light of FBI Director James Comey’s disclosure Friday that the bureau is reviewing newly-found emails in relation to its investigation of Clinton’s use of a private server while she was secretary of state. While most of those voters are Republican, the concern in the Clinton camp is that anything that encourages Trump’s voters and discourages Clinton’s is dangerous this close to the election.

The new emails under review were found during a separate FBI investigation of former Congressman Anthony Weiner, the estranged husband of Clinton's longtime aide and adviser Huma Abedin.

"Hillary Clinton could put all this to rest today by asking Huma Abedin to tell us all what is in those emails," Conway said.

Conway further argued that the only person whom Clinton should blame for the FBI's review of the newly-discovered emails is Weiner.

"This is not the 'vast right-wing conspiracy,'" Conway said, alluding to Clinton's well-known claim when her husband, Bill Clinton, was president that an organized network of political conservatives was conspiring against him.

"This is not the [Republican National Committee], or the Trump campaign," Conway continued. "It's Huma Abedin's husband."