Trump, Flynn once criticized Clinton aides for seeking immunity

PHOTO: President Donald Trump passed Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford, left, and National Security Adviser Michael Flynn as he arrives via Air Force One at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Florida, Feb. 6, 2017. PlaySusan Walsh/AP Photo
WATCH Flynn offers to testify before Senate in exchange for immunity: Official

Donald Trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn has asked for "assurances against unfair prosecution" in investigations into Russia's meddling in the 2016 U.S. election, but both Flynn and Trump previously criticized Hillary Clinton's aides for asking for similar treatment during the campaign.

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Trump attacked Clinton's aides repeatedly on the campaign trail for seeking immunity in exchange for their testimony in the investigation of Clinton's use of a private email server while she was serving as secretary of state.

"The reason they get immunity is because they did something wrong, if they didn’t do anything wrong, they don’t think in terms of immunity," he said at a rally in Wisconsin last September.

At another rally in Florida the day before, Trump asked, "If you are not guilty of a crime, what do you need immunity for? Right."

He tweeted at Clinton in October, "ATTN: @HillaryClinton - Why did five of your staffers need FBI IMMUNITY?!"

For his part, Flynn told NBC's "Meet the Press" in September of the aides involved in the Clinton probe, “When you are given immunity, that means you probably committed a crime.”

Several Clinton staffers were given immunity deals in exchange for cooperating with the House Oversight Committee's investigation into her private email server, including Brian Pagliano, a former State Department employee who set up the server, and Clinton's then-chief of staff, Cheryl Mills.

House and Senate intelligence committees are investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election and alleged contacts between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. Flynn is in discussions to testify in both investigations, according to his lawyer, Robert Kelner.

"General Flynn has a story to tell, and he very much wants to tell it, should the circumstances permit," said Kelner on Thursday evening.

Kelner confirmed that the "discussions have taken place" but would not comment on the details.

"Notwithstanding his life of national service, the media are awash with unfounded allegations, outrageous claims of treason, and vicious innuendo directed against him," Kelner said. "No reasonable person, who has the benefit of advice from counsel, would submit to questioning in such a highly politicized, witch hunt environment without assurances against unfair prosecution."

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