Over 1 Million Xbox Ones Sold in the First 24 Hours

PHOTO: The first fans in the U.S. get their hands on Xbox One at Best Buy in New York on Nov. 22, 2013.
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Microsoft's latest video game console, the Xbox One, is more than holding its own in the wake of sales figures for Sony's new PlayStation 4. Like the PS4, the Xbox One also sold more than one million units in the first day alone.

Brian Blau, research director in consumer technologies for Gartner, said that one million units sold for either company is very respectable. "It's a positive sign that gamers are still very interested in these consoles," he told ABC News. "It shows that there has been a lot of pent up demand over the past seven to eight years."

The Playstation 4 and Xbox One, Back to Back
The Playstation 4 and Xbox One, Back to Back

There is a caveat to directly comparing the two new systems' sales figures. PlayStation debuted Nov. 15 in the United States and Canada. The Xbox One was released in 11 additional countries. However, Blau says not to read these numbers to divine what the future holds for the two systems.

"One million isn't a lot in the lifetime of a product that stretches out for five to seven years," he said. "It'll be months and years to come before we see which console the game players are really favoring."

Sales aren't the only way that the Xbox One and PS4 compare. Both systems have also had a small (but vocal) percentage of its users reporting hardware issues. In contrast to the PlayStation 4's "Blue Light of Death, some of the new Xbox Ones have broken disc drives unable to play games or movies. Microsoft did not specify how many consoles were affected, only saying that "the issue is affecting a very small number of Xbox One customers."

Blau says that such problems aren't surprising. "I spoke with other analysts and when you're talking about PC-like things, with brand new hardware and architecture, these errors shouldn't be unexpected," he said. "Over time, the companies will fix these issues and change their manufacturing processes to compensate for them."

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