City of Brotherly Love to Officially Apologize to Late Jackie Robinson for 1947 Racism

PHOTO: Jackie Robinson, Brooklyn Dodgers first baseman, is shown at Ebbets Field, April 11, 1947.PlayAP Photo
WATCH April 15, 1947: Jackie Robinson makes major league debut

Major Baseball League's first black player is pitched to receive a posthumous apology for the bitter racism he endured 69 years ago during a visit to the City of Brotherly Love.

Philadelphia's City Council unanimously passed a resolution today to officially apologize to the late Jackie Robinson who made MBL history on April 15, 1947.

"Unfortunately in Philadelphia, Jackie Robinson experienced some of the most virulent racism and hate of his career," Councilwoman Helen Gym, who introduced the resolution, told ABC News. "Our colleagues decided to introduce this resolution to celebrate Jackie Robinson."

Robinson was refused service by a local hotel in the city and was taunted by Philadelphia Phillies manager Ben Chapman. Opposing players would hurl racial slurs every time Robinson went up to bat.

The city will honor Robinson's achievements on April 15, 2016. His 93-year-old widow, Rachel, is expected to accept the apology.

"42," a 2013 biographical film that details how Robinson was treated in Philadelphia, was a box office success.

Robinson died in 1972 at the age of 53.

PHOTO: Jackie Robinson and Dick Cavett, on The Dick Cavett Show on Jan. 26, 1972. ABC, via Getty Images
Jackie Robinson and Dick Cavett, on "The Dick Cavett Show" on Jan. 26, 1972.
PHOTO: Rachel Robinson, wife of Jackie Robinson, an MLB legend, speaks to the crowd during a ceremony honoring her husband before the Los Angeles Dodgers game against the San Diego Padres on April 15, 2005, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images
Rachel Robinson, wife of Jackie Robinson, an MLB legend, speaks to the crowd during a ceremony honoring her husband before the Los Angeles Dodgers game against the San Diego Padres on April 15, 2005, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles.