First Funerals for Slain Orlando Victims to Be Held Today

President Obama and Biden head to Orlando to console families.

— -- As investigators continue to figure out what motivated a gunman to shoot up a gay nightclub, killing 49 people last weekend, families of some of those victims are preparing to say their final goodbyes to loved ones today.

Luis Omar Ocasio-Capo, 20, and Eric Ortiz-Rivera, 36, are the first two victims of the mass shooting to be laid to rest Thursday afternoon in Orlando.

Consoler-in-Chief

President Obama will be arriving to the city today as Orlando and the nation continue to mourn the dozens of lives lost in the mass shooting.

"The president while he's there will also have an opportunity to speak publicly about what he sees, and also about the message that he's preparing to deliver on behalf of the country, to make clear that the country stands with the people of Orlando, stands with the LGBT community in Orlando, as they grieve for their loss," White House spokesman Josh Earnest said.

Earnest added that Obama would also spend some time talking to first responders and medical professionals, including EMTs, nurses, doctors and surgeons who acted "heroically, courageously, and in some cases with disregard for their own safety to try to save innocent lives.”

FBI officials Wednesday called the massacre that left 50 dead, including the shooter, at the nightclub both an act of terrorism and a hate crime.

Investigators are still piecing together possible motives for the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history, with the focusing recently turning toward the shooter's wife, Noor Mateen, whom the FBI is still investigating, though no charges have been filed.

New details have begun to emerge about Omar Mateen. When he was a freshman in high school, Mateen was sent to an alternative school after he got into a fight with a fellow student, he wrote in a questionnaire for the Indian River State College Criminal Justice Training, which he filled out on Nov. 19, 2014. It is unclear what the fight was about. In his employment history, Mateen, who said he had a degree in criminal justice from Indian River State College, wrote that he had worked at the Marin Correctional Institution in Indiantown, Florida as a correctional officer trainee from October 2006 to April 2007, and cited the reason for leaving as "probationary dismissal."

On the questionnaire, Mateen said that in 2006, he was on a "ridealong" with a police deputy in St. Lucie when the patrol car hydroplaned and "got wrapped around a tree." In a portion of the questionnaire dealing with drug usage, Mateen answered "yes" to having used cannabis or marijuana and steroids. He wrote that he did not drink alcohol, the documents say.

Mateen checked "yes" to a question that asked whether he had "ever been arrested, charged or received a notice or summons to appear, convicted, pled nolo contendere or pled guilty for any criminal violation or detained by ANY law enforcement agency."

There was no further explanation on the form.

Mateen also checked "yes" to a question asking if he had ever committed or been involved in an undetected crime of any type, such as drinking, petit theft, shoplifting or stealing from an employer. Again, there was no further explanation.

Mateen said he had some sort of criminal record sealed or expunged, but no explanation was provided as to what the record was.

Facebook Threats?

Mateen apparently made a series of Facebook posts and searches before and during his attack on the LGBT nightclub, raging against the "filthy ways of the west" and blaming the United States for the deaths of "innocent women and children," according to a Senate committee.

The Senate Homeland Security Committee sent a letter to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, asking the company to produce information on Mateen's online activity and to provide a briefing to the panel.

Senators asked for a briefing and material to be provided by Facebook to the committee by June 29.