Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg honored in historic ceremony at US Capitol

The Supreme Court justice passed away at the age of 87 on Sept. 18.

The late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg became the first woman and first Jewish person to lie in state at the U.S. Capitol on Friday.

The honor, which comes a week after her death at the age of 87 due to complications of metastatic pancreas cancer, pays tribute to the country's most distinguished citizens.

Since 1852, over 30 men have lain in state, including 12 former presidents, as well as other statesmen and military leaders, per historical records. The last person to have lain in state was Georgia congressman and civil rights activist John Lewis, who died in July.

Civil rights icon Rosa Parks was "lain in honor" at the Capitol in 2005, but Ginsburg is the first woman ever to lie in state.

"Justice Ginsburg embodied justice, brilliance and goodness, and her passing is an incalculable loss for our democracy and for all who sacrifice and strive to build a better future for our children," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said upon her passing. "Every family in America benefited from her brilliant legacy and courage. Her opinions have unequivocally cemented the precedent that all men and women are created equal.”

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Statuary Hall set up for next portion 

Statuary Hall has been reset for the next portion of  the ceremony, which will feature lawmakers who were not invited to the memorial will have a chance to pay their respects.

The first portion featured prominent politicians like Speaker Nancy Pelosi, former vice president and 2020 presidential candidate Joe Bidden and Senator Kamala Harris.


Intimate statuary Hall ceremony concludes

Family and friends have finished paying their respects, concluding an intimate ceremony mostly made up of close family members and lawmakers.

The family is scheduled to hold a private burial at Arlington National Cemetery next week.


Family, congressional leaders pay their respects


Family members, followed by members of Congress, are now paying their respects one by one, with an emphasis on social distancing.



Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt delivers reflection

Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt of Adas Israel Congregation in Washington delivered a eulogy and reflection followed by a second musical selection by Mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves accompanied by pianist Laura Ward. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi delivered opening remarks.