Midwest, Great Plains brace for more severe weather, flooding

PHOTO: Tulsa County Sheriffs Deputy Miranda Munson makes her way back to a fan boat after checking a flooded house for occupants in the Town and Country neighborhood in Sand Springs, Okla., Thursday, May 23, 2019.PlayMike Simons/Tulsa World via AP
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The Midwest and Great Plains, already hit hard by storms and tornadoes, is bracing for more severe weather as Memorial Day weekend comes to a close, and areas along the Arkansas River are expecting "record levels" of flooding in the coming days.

On Monday evening there were flash flood watches in effect in parts of Wyoming, South Dakota and Nebraska, and severe thunderstorm watches in effect in Nebraska and northeastern Kansas, according to the National Weather Service. Flash floods are possible in Wyoming, South Dakota, Minnesota, and Illinois. Tornado warnings have been issued for central Indiana.

Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson approved $100,000 in emergency funding in response to flooding that "is expected to reach record levels throughout the state in the coming week," according to a release from the governor's office. The Arkansas Department of Transportation has closed two bridges that span the river in Ft. Smith.

PHOTO: Tulsa County Sheriffs Deputy Miranda Munson makes her way back to a fan boat after checking a flooded house for occupants in the Town and Country neighborhood in Sand Springs, Okla., Thursday, May 23, 2019. Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP
Tulsa County Sheriff's Deputy Miranda Munson makes her way back to a fan boat after checking a flooded house for occupants in the Town and Country neighborhood in Sand Springs, Okla., Thursday, May 23, 2019.

"I appreciate all the neighbors and volunteers filling sandbags and assisting with evacuations. The state team is continuing to respond to assistance requests, and more funds will be allocated as the situation demands," Governor Hutchinson said in the release.

Heavy rain and thunderstorms -- some of them severe -- are predicted across large swaths of the country, stretching from North Dakota all the way down to Texas. As of Monday night, there were reports of damage due to storms in several counties in Indiana, with power out in some areas.

Flood watches and thunder storms on Monday night follow several days of dramatic and deadly weather in the heartland.

More than 100 tornadoes were reported across eight states -- Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Illinois, and Maryland -- from Monday through Thursday of last week.

At least two people were killed and 29 were injured when a tornado touched down in El Reno, Oklahoma, on Saturday.

"This community is brokenhearted, we're hurt, we're absolutely devastated," said El Reno Mayor Matt White.