Police: Mountain Goat Killed Hiker

VIDEO: Art Colyer describes his pets encounter with a mountain lion.PlayABCNEWS.com
WATCH Donkey Aids Goat in Lion Attack

A 63-year-old man has died in a Port Angeles hospital after an attack from what state rangers believe was an angry mountain goat in Olympic National Park.

Park services officials said that Robert H. Boardman, of Port Angeles, Washington, was gored on Saturday while hiking close to the park's Klahhane Ridge. He was transported by U.S. Coast Guard helicopter to the hospital, where he later died.

"I am deeply saddened by this tragedy," said Karen Gustin, Olympic National Park superintendent. "My thoughts are with his family and friends."

It is unclear what sort of injuries Boardman suffered from the attack, but early investigations indicate that it was his encounter with a mountain goat that led to his injuries. Rangers have now tracked down and killed the animal, which will be analyzed by a veterinary pathologist, according to ABC News affiliate KOMO.

VIDEO: Art Colyer describes his pets encounter with a mountain lion.Play
Donkey Aids Goat in Mountain Lion Attack

Officials said this is the only known fatal attack by a mountain goat in the park's history, and that there are roughly 3000 mountain goats in the park.

Family and friends told KOMO that Boardman was an experienced hiker, a diabetes nurse and a musician who loved the Olympic Mountains.

Witnesses reported to the Peninsula Daily News that Boardman had gone with his wife, Susan Chadd, and their friend, Pat Willits for a day's hike. The three stopped for lunch around 1:20 p.m. when they were approached by the goat, who appeared aggressive.

At 1:23 p.m., park rangers contacted the Coast Guard, while Baccus began cardiopulmonary resuscitation on Boardman.

According to Lt. Commander Scott Sanborn, Boardman did not have a pulse when he was administered electric shock in an attempt to revive him.

Viral videoPlay
null

Boardman arrived at Olympic Medical Center at approximately 2:47 p.m., where further efforts to revive him were unsuccessful, according to nursing supervisor Pattijo Hoskins.

Barb Maynes, a spokeswoman for the park, said the ram involved in the attack was known for its aggressive behavior, and the park had been monitoring the ram for "the last several years," she said.

Comments