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Alleged Haunted Homes Popular on Real Estate Market

Some buyers think it's cool to own a home where tenants of the supernatural also supposedly live.
8:31 | 07/11/14

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Transcript for Alleged Haunted Homes Popular on Real Estate Market
Some houses come with history, and some come with ghosts. Which would you rather live in? 62% of Americans would consider buying a haunted house. And some already live in one. Chris Conley goes ghost busting to find out about this, and you won't believe the answers. They're here. Reporter: Looking to buy a new home? Maybe the family from "Poltergeist" should have. Turns out that just like in the '80s cult classic "House" some places offer buyers more unusual features than walk-in closets or a wood-burning fireplace. All my staff knows about our friendly ghosts. Reporter: When Susie Garcia and her husband bought this 1888 colonial revival mansion in Pleasanton, California, she says they didn't know all its rich history until they started to renovate the property a little bit. And when we did that, that's when we started to notice things moving. Reporter: On a street infamous for its shootouts in the 1850s in a locale then called "The most desperate town in the west," it's now the site of the Garcias' restaurant, the blue agave club, where, Susie says, they are not alone. We'll be down here, and you hear footsteps upstairs. So if you are the manager and you're ready to close, you always have a buddy to close at night. Reporter: Susie herself has had a spectral patron who wanted a table for none. I had a knock on the door. And I went to see who it was. Nobody. Just started talking and letting the person know that I was happy to play, but I was busy. And to please not bother me. And it stopped. Reporter: But if you think Susie's spooked about having purchased a place she says has ghosts inside and out, you're in for the fright of your life. Would you say on balance that hang spirits in your restaurant and the building above is a good thing or a bad thing? I would say it's a good thing. I really feel like those that are here are here and they like us. There are buyers out there that think it's cool to own a home that may have ghosts. Reporter: Based here in northern California, real estate agent Cindi Hagley specializes in the selling of so-called stigmatized properties. You're talking about haunted houses. Haunted houses, yes. Right now we are in a seller's market in almost all of northern California. You can have a dead body swinging from the chandelier and I'm still going to have ten offers on the phone. Reporter: Cindi runs past life homes and says plenty of houses for sale come with tenants who may have lived there for hundreds of years. What's it like when you tell a potential buyer that the house they're looking at is haunted? Some don't care. Some expect a huge discount. Reporter: How much of a discount do you get on a haunted house? With me they get nothing. Reporter: Zip, nothing? No. Reporter: You have extra tenants. You actually get a ghost premium on a house with a happy ghost. People will pay a little extra, because they can talk about it at the next cocktail party. You can even invite the ghost. Reporter: But if it's regrets only for these "Smooth apparators," and they prefer to stay housebound, such demons aren't deal-breakers. Anytime things get a little ethereal, Cindi has it made with the shade. I have a team of paranormal investigators. And partners that will come in. Reporter: Paranormal investigators? Is that because the term "Ghostbusters" is a trademark? Who's she gonna call? Mark Christopher Nelson, medium rare. He's got a sixth sense to spot the undead where you or I would see only dust bunnies. At our request he agreed to check out the upstairs at Susie's hotspot. One of the first things I got was a bunch of children running all over the place. Just kids, it feels like an echo. I really want to go in this room. Get a sense of it. Reporter: Don't let me stop you. As he does for buyers who want spirits to skedaddle, mark implores any perturbed paranormals in this house to find a fixer-upper elsewhere. I'm asking all negative energy to leave this room. We're gentle in our approach. Reporter: But you're evicting these spirits. We're not evicting them. We're helping them. Reporter: What happens when somebody gets kind of a gleam in their eye when you tell them that the house they're looking at is haunted, that they're excited at the prospect? What's that like? Well, I usually call a security guard to protect me because they're usually nuts. Reporter: In cali and elsewhere, realtors are required to tell buyers if a home purportedly has ghostly inhabitants. Landlords? Not so much. This week Catrina mcghaw told KMOV in St. Louis that she learned from a TV documentary the apartment she'd rented had been used by serial killer maury Travis. This whole basement was basically his torture chamber. Reporter: Why hadn't she been told? Maybe because the landlord was the serial killer's mother? Haunted houses can come in all shapes, sizes and scary histories, in real life and in popular culture. Take this landmarked leviathan in the heart of Los Angeles. It's got a list of credits any actor would kill for. Like "Buffy the vampire slayer." Recently it starred in the emmy-winning "American horror story." Welcome. In the first season of "American horror story" there was a body hanging from the rafters up there in the foyer. But that didn't really happen. That was just the TV show. Reporter: It was all make-believe. This is a very special house. Reporter: Joe babajian is one of l.a.'s top realtors. He's sold the most stigmatized properties imaginable -- o.j.'s house and Nicole brown Simpson's condo. In your view, did it sell for less or for more than an average property of that kind would have sold for? Probably a little less. I think that there was a negative stigma there. Reporter: This house's TV notoriety seems to attract looky-loos daily. There are tourists right out there now taking pictures of this house. Yeah, all the time. They're always out there. Reporter: Part oversized frat house, part elegantly distressed early 20th century gem, this one of a kinder is screaming for purchase by some eccentric entertainer. At times, it may also just be screaming, period. Pardon me if this sounds like a moronic question, Joe. Is this house haunted? I kind of have that feeling. Reporter: Ask the man who owns it. Anybody home? He sees dead people, all over his place, especially in the basement. Do you think the property is haunted? I know it's haunted. I see ghosts here on a pretty much weekly basis. Reporter: What are they doing? Watching me, doing things. Reporter: Doesn't freak you out? No, not at all. Reporter: John Gocha points out a bricked-up room in the basement where he suspects, well, let's just say it's not where the ping-pong table was. There's no way in and no way out. Reporter: Yes. Now, why did somebody do that? If you want to stand up here, take a peek and see what's in there. Reporter: Maybe people go in and never come out. Every time I go by the laundry room with the washing machine on I hear conversations. People having conversations clear as day. Reporter: So anybody that buys this house, in your view, had better get used to the idea of living with a bunch of -- Yeah, and they're not bad. They're good people. I think they're looking for somebody to hang out with. Reporter: And for the right buyer at the right time, the spirits may be willing. So you like working in a haunted house? Yeah. Just not, like, at night by myself. S. And you can still buy that house for a killer price. Down from the original $16 million to $5 million. Would you buy the house?

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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