General Motors
  • Chevrolet Centennial

    The first Chevrolet was the famous "Classic Six," seen here in 1911 in front of the Chevrolet Motor Car Company factory in Detroit. Louis Chevrolet is at the wheel.
    General Motors
  • Chevrolet Centennial

    In late 1913, just two years after its founding, Chevrolet introduced the 1914 "Royal Mail" roadster. It was the first Chevy to wrap almost every Chevrolet-specific attribute into one car. Contemporary and jaunty, the Royal Mail had great visual appeal. Its reliable 171-cid 4-cylinder engine had overhead valves, a premium design that contributed to its relatively high power rating.
    General Motors
  • Chevrolet Centennial

    The early Suburban was the grandfather of the modern SUV. However, the steel-bodied, truck-based Chevy Suburban "Carryall" originated as a more robust and accommodating alternative to "woodie" station wagons when it was introduced in mid-1935. Continuing into 1936 with few changes, the first generation Suburban was often put to work carrying up to eight persons, plus their gear and luggage.
    General Motors
  • Chevrolet Centennial

    Chevy's new Advance Design trucks for 1948 were the first completely restyled General Motors vehicles introduced after World War II. From the start, people loved the new Chevy pickups. The new, roomier cabs for '48 provided spacious three-across seating. Reliable and versatile, the Chevy half-ton pickup continued as the farmer's and tradesman's four-wheeled friend.
    General Motors
  • Chevrolet Centennial

    During the decades since the first Chevy trucks rolled out in 1918, some once-common uses for Chevrolet trucks, and the special models that served these needs, have fallen by the wayside. Open-sided panel trucks called Canopy Express trucks were once common and used for many types of delivery services. Before supermarkets, "hucksters" sold fruits and vegetables curbside from such trucks.
    General Motors
  • Chevrolet Centennial

    The 1959 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Concept, photographed in studio.
    General Motors
  • Chevrolet Centennial

    The Beach Boys sang harmonies to Chevy's 409-cid big-block V8, rated at a thumping 425 horsepower for 1963. The hardtop '63 Impala Sport Coupe, with its convertible-look roofline, crisply tailored flanks and pointed fenders, beautifully showcased the big engine. The 1963 Impala could also be had with a Chevy 283 or 327 small-block V8 engine, and was even available as a 6-cylinder model.
    General Motors
  • Chevrolet Centennial

    Providing a spectacular grand finale to the first-generation (1967–69) Camaro, the freshly restyled '69s raced through a year of unprecedented exhilaration. Chevy's hot four-seat sportster was a hit at the dragstrip and the racetrack, pacing the 1969 Indy 500.
    General Motors
  • Chevrolet Centennial

    The El Camino "passenger-car pickup" first appeared in 1959 and was, along with the '60 edition, based on the full-size Chevy. Following a three-year hiatus, the El Camino returned for 1964 as a derivative of the new intermediate-size 1964 Chevelle. The restyled '68 El Camino was as sleek as any vehicle with a pickup bed could be.
    General Motors
  • Chevrolet Centennial

    Battery powered for the first 25 to 50 miles after charging up, the revolutionary electric-powered Chevy Volt, with its gas-powered generator, seamlessly provides additional electricity to continue on for another 300 miles or so, when needed. This frees Volt owners from the range anxiety that can haunt owners of battery-powered cars.
    General Motors
  • Chevrolet Centennial

    The 2012 Centennial Edition Corvette pays homage to Chevrolet's history and racing heritage, even as its bold, edgy monochrome appearance places it firmly in the present. Ever since 1955, when the fledgling Corvette was first fitted with the new small-block Chevrolet V8, Corvette has personified the passion and performance of Chevrolet.
    General Motors
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