Nabisco Unveils Miniature Version of the Oreo

They may not contain as many calories

as the original Oreo, but chances are you will eat enough of the

miniature version to make it up in volume.

Nabisco Biscuit Co. launches the Mini Oreo today at its corporate headquarters during a promotional blitz that includes a dump truck filling a minivan with the chocolate sandwich cookies. (The person who correctly guesses how many cookies fit in the Dodge Caravan gets to keep it, plus a year’s supply of the new cookies.)

The quarter-sized cookies should hit stores shelves Monday, the company said. An 8-ounce resealable bag will sell for $2.39. Single-serve pouches and vendor packs will also be available.

“We’re really trying to capture the hand-to-mouth, on-the-go snacking market,” said Archie Mack, business director for the Oreo brand.

Mack said the company plans to make 25 million pounds of the tiny treats and that the Mini Oreo is the largest product launch in the history of the brand.

First Permanent Cookie in Years

Mini Oreo is the first permanent cookie under the Oreo banner since the Reduced Fat line was introduced six years ago.

In April, Nabisco offered a limited edition Oreo that created swirls of blue when dunked in milk. It was available for about six weeks before they ran out. The company made 9 million pounds of the Magic Dunkers.

Double Stuf Oreo, which contains a double dollop of vanilla creme, hit the market in 1975. The original Oreo was launched in 1912, and quickly became the world’s top-selling cookie.

The mini version contains 15.6 calories per cookie, while the original recipe has 53.3 calories.

Nabisco also makes mini Chips Ahoy and Nutter Butter Bites and Ritz Bits sandwich snacks.

Nabisco Biscuit, the U.S. cookie and cracker business of Nabisco Holdings Corp., posted $3.64 billion in 1999 sales. The Oreo brand accounted for about $550 million of those sales.

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