Juror in Amanda Knox Case Says Verdict Was 'Agonizing Decision'

Amanda Knox and former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, were found guilty of murdering Knox's British roommate, Meredith Kercher in Novemebr 2007. Amanda was sentenced to 26 years in prison, while Sollecito was given 25 years.

Within minutes after the verdict, Knox and Sollecito were whisked out of the courtroom, into a prison van with sirens blaring that took her back to the jail in the outskirts of Perugia that has been her home for the last two years.

Knox's parents, step-parents, three sisters and aunt all traveled from Seattle to Perugia on Thanksgiving for their final days of waiting.

The nightmare began even before the Knox family got into the courtroom. Outside the medieval courthouse, it was pandemonium as hordes of press and onlookers gathered and pushed to get inside.

At 9 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 4, the family received a phone call from their lawyer: a verdict had been reached. They were to arrive at the courthouse at midnight. Those final hours were agonizing, Mellas told Vargas.

Amanda Knox's Mother Tells Her to Have 'Courage'

"People are deciding, basically, the life of your child. It's horrific. My heart was pounding. [We] were definitely ill, sick to our stomachs," Mellas recalled.

Knox's fate was decided by two Italian judges and six jurors who were not sequestered, screened for biases and could freely read media reports.

Knox's family was literally crushed by a press mob scene waiting outside the courthouse. "We couldn't get in . We got to the door, within 10 feet, but because the crowd was so huge and crushing, we turned around and had to find a back entrance to the courthouse. It was horrible," Mellas explained.

Things weren't any better after the verdict. The family was not allowed to see Knox before she was whisked back to jail. As they left the courtroom, they vowed to appeal, but the know the appeal process will be long and expensive for a family who has already spent at least a million dollars defending their daughter.

"We will do whatever it takes to support Amanda," the family insisted in a statement shortly after the verdict.

The family says their daughter is innocent and continue to hope she will eventually come home.

"All over the world, not just in Italy, in the United States too, truly innocent people are found guilty and this is one of those cases. She is innocent," Mellas said.

This weekend Amanda's family was allowed to see her for the first time since the verdict.

Before Amanda's lawyers can appeal, the judges and jurors have to release their reasoning behind the verdict which is expected within 90 days.

The debate over the legitimacy of the verdictS continued today on "Good Morning America" where reknowned criminal lawyer Ted Simon and Vanity Fair contributing editor Judy Bachrach assailed the verdict and the Italian justice system.

Simon said the "lack of evidence is both compelling and profound," and that she was convicted of murder despite the fact that there was "no sweat, no salavia, no DNA of Amanda Knox" in Kercher's room.

Bachrach said, "Although constitutionally, theoretically the individual is innocent until proven guilt in reality that is not the case… If you are accused you will very likely going to be convicted if it goes far enough."

She said Knox "didn't have a chance" because "she is an outsider. If you are an outsider, a foreigner, you don't know a lot of famous powerful people you are sunk."

Bachrach said there is a chance that Knox could win her case on appeal.

"There is a possibility if Italy is ashamed enough," she said. "She might win on appeal, but it will take a lot of influence…it will take a lot of clout, a lot of work, I'm afraid."

ABC News' Kirit Radia contributed to this report

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